Skill Piper

The History of Literature

Brought to you by, Jacke Wilson / The Podglomerate

https://skillpiper.com/share/1048375034

The History of Literature

Amateur enthusiast Jacke Wilson journeys through the history of literature, from ancient epics to contemporary classics. Episodes are not in chronological order and you don't need to start at the beginning - feel free to jump in wherever you like! Find out more at historyofliterature.com and facebook.com/historyofliterature. Support the show by visiting patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. Contact the show at historyofliteraturepodcast@gmail.com.

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Recent Episodes of The History of Literature


620 Necromantics (with Renee Fox) | Herman Hesse on What We Learn from Trees

620 Necromantics (with Renee Fox) | Herman Hesse on What We Learn from Trees

What was the deal with the Victorians and their obsession with reanimating corpses? How did writers like Mary Shelley, Robert Browning, Charles Dickens, W.B. Yeats, Bram Stoker, and others breathe life into the undead - and why did they do it? We can attribute their efforts to the present's desire to remake the past in its own image - but what does that mean exactly? In this episode, Jacke talks to Professor Renée Fox about her book The Necromantics: Reanimation, the Historical Imagination, and Victorian British and Irish Literature. PLUS Jacke explores what notable German-Swiss author Herman H...

Episode 11 July 2024 1h, 4m and 34s


619 Fred Waitzkin on Kerouac, Hemingway, and His New Novel | My Last Book with Michael Blanding

619 Fred Waitzkin on Kerouac, Hemingway, and His New Novel | My Last Book with Michael Blanding

Novelist Fred Waitzkin (Searching for Bobby Fischer) stops by to discuss Jack Kerouac, Ernest Hemingway, and his new novel Anything Is Good, which tells the story of a childhood friend who was a genius - and who ended up living among the unhoused for years. PLUS Michael Blanding (In Shakespeare's Shadow: A Rogue Scholar's Quest to Reveal the True Source Behind the World's Greatest Plays) stops by to discuss his choice for the last book he will ever read.

Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The History of Literature Podcast is a m...

Episode 619 8 July 2024 56m and 12s


618 A Year of Women's Diaries (with Sarah Gristwood) | Sharon Olds | My Last Book with Suzanne Scanlon

618 A Year of Women's Diaries (with Sarah Gristwood) | Sharon Olds | My Last Book with Suzanne Scanlon

Women haven't always been given an equal chance to contribute to literature - but they were writing nevertheless, sometimes just for themselves. In this episode, Jacke talks to Sarah Gristwood (Secret Voices: A Year of Women's Diaries) about her new collection of extracts from four centuries of women's diaries. PLUS Jacke shares a poem by Sharon Olds and talks to Suzanne Scanlon (Committed: On Meaning and Madwomen) about her choice for the last book she will ever read.

Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The History of Literature Podcast is a mem...

Episode 618 1 July 2024 52m and 26s


617 Politics and Grace in Early Modern Literature (with Deni Kasa) | Mike Recommends... James Baldwin! | My Last Book with Carlos Allende

617 Politics and Grace in Early Modern Literature (with Deni Kasa) | Mike Recommends... James Baldwin! | My Last Book with Carlos Allende

Early modern poets - John Milton, Edmund Spenser, Aemilia Lanyer, Abraham Cowley - lived in a world where theological questions were as hotly contested as political struggles over issues like empire, gender, civil war, and poetic authority. In this episode, Jacke talks to Deni Kasa (The Politics of Grace in Early Modern Literature) about the ways poets used the theological concept of grace to reimagine their political communities. PLUS Mike Palindrome tells Jacke about his admiration for James Baldwin and his works. AND Carlos Allende (Coffee, Shopping, Murder, Love) tells Jacke about his choice for the last book he...

Episode 617 27 June 2024 1h, 12m and 7s


616 Madwomen and Literature (with Suzanne Scanlon) | Sylvia Plath | My Last Book with Adhar Noor Desai

616 Madwomen and Literature (with Suzanne Scanlon) | Sylvia Plath | My Last Book with Adhar Noor Desai

The relationship between literature and "madwomen" has deep roots. In this episode, Jacke talks to author Suzanne Scanlon (Committed: On Meaning and Madwomen) about her efforts to reclaim the idea of the madwoman as a template for insight and transcendence. PLUS Jacke talks to Adhar Noor Desai (Blotted Lines: Early Modern English Literature and the Poetics of Discomposition) about his choice for the last book he will ever read.

Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Lea...

Episode 616 24 June 2024 1h, 11m and 59s


615 Nicholson Baker | My Last Book with Vera Kutizinski and Anthony Reed

615 Nicholson Baker | My Last Book with Vera Kutizinski and Anthony Reed

What a treat! First, Jacke talks to Nicholson Baker, an author he's been reading for the past three decades, about Finding a Likeness: How I Got Somewhat Better at Art, Baker's deeply personal account of his journey learning how to paint for the first time, and a meditation on the power of art in times of crisis. Then Vera Kutizinski and Anthony Reed, editors of Langston Hughes in Context, stop by to discuss their choices for the last books they will ever read. Enjoy!

Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/donate. The His...

Episode 615 17 June 2024 1h, 19m and 59s


614 Family Matters (with Bill Eville) | Fatherhood in Three Poems | Storytime with Jacke

614 Family Matters (with Bill Eville) | Fatherhood in Three Poems | Storytime with Jacke

Families can provide wonderful material for a writer, but they can also be tricky to navigate. How do you make your stories of home interesting to other people? What's too personal? What's not personal enough? In this episode, Jacke talks to author Bill Eville (Washed Ashore: Family, Fatherhood, and Finding Home on Martha's Vineyard) about his personal journey as a father, a husband, and a writer. PLUS Jacke celebrates Father's Day with three poems (by Ben Jonson, Sharon Olds, and Edgar Albert Guest) and an object lesson of his own ("The Burger Car").

Help support the show...

Episode 614 13 June 2024 1h, 23m and 41s


613 Celebrating the Book-Makers (with Adam Smyth) | My Last Book with Christopher de Hamel

613 Celebrating the Book-Makers (with Adam Smyth) | My Last Book with Christopher de Hamel

Books are beloved objects, earning lots of praise as amazing pieces of technology and essential contributors to a civilized society. And yet, we often take these cultural miracles for granted. Who's been making these things for the last several centuries? How have they influenced what we've been reading? In this episode, Jacke talks to author Adam Smyth, an Oxford professor of literature who opened up his own small press, about his new work The Book-Makers: A History of the Book in Eighteen Lives. Then medieval manuscript expert Christopher de Hamel (The Manuscripts Club: The People Behind a Thousand Years...

Episode 613 10 June 2024 1h, 1m and 57s


612 Finding Margaret Fuller (with Allison Pataki) | My Last Book with James Marcus

612 Finding Margaret Fuller (with Allison Pataki) | My Last Book with James Marcus

Fearless and fiercely intelligent, the nineteenth-century American feminist Margaret Fuller was "the radiant genius and fiery heart" of the Transcendentalists, the group of New Englanders who helped launch a fledgling nation onto the world's cultural and literary stage. In this episode, bestselling historical novelist Allison Pataki, author of the new novel Finding Margaret Fuller, joins Jacke to discuss what it was like to bring this remarkable nineteenth-century woman to life. PLUS James Marcus (Glad to the Brink of Fear: A Portrait of Ralph Waldo Emerson) stops by to discuss his choice for the last book he will ever read.<...

Episode 612 3 June 2024 57m and 16s


611 John Buchan (with Ursula Buchan) | My Last Book with Marsha Gordon | A Hemingway Letter

611 John Buchan (with Ursula Buchan) | My Last Book with Marsha Gordon | A Hemingway Letter

Scottish writer John Buchan is perhaps best known for his pioneering thriller The Thirty-Nine Steps, the source material for one of Alfred Hitchcock's first great films. But as his biographer (and granddaughter) Ursula Buchan tells Jacke, Buchan was far from a one-hit wonder. John Buchan wrote more than a hundred books of fiction and non-fiction and a thousand newspaper and magazine articles - and he was just getting started. Ursula's book Beyond the Thirty-Nine Steps: A Life of John Buchan depicts the remarkable life of this twentieth-century writer (and scholar, antiquarian, barrister, journal editor, war correspondent, member of parliament...

Episode 30 May 2024 1h, 6m and 47s

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