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Code search, dev flow & testing: Sourcegraph & Hoppscotch - S01E07

Code search, dev flow & testing: Sourcegraph & Hoppscotch - S01E07

Console DevTools 19 August 2021

Episode Description

Episode 7 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software).

Tools discussed:

  1. Sourcegraph - code search engine.
  2. Hoppscotch - test UI for API requests.

Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev

Other things mentioned:

Let us know what you think on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur

https://twitter.com/davidmytton

https://twitter.com/consoledotdev

Or by email: hello@console.dev

We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like.

We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria.

Recorded: 2021-08-10.

...see more

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Building Tools Devs Love, with Erica Brescia (Redpoint) - S04E02

Building Tools Devs Love, with Erica Brescia (Redpoint) - S04E02

In this episode, we speak with Erica Brescia, Managing Director at Redpoint Ventures, and previously COO at GitHub. We discuss what's changed since she started her first DevTools company back in the mid-2000s, how to build tools developers love, whether open source is just a marketing strategy, and what she looks for in software investments. She also sheds light on how to get a new product in front of developers, whether or not more people should be bootstrapping their companies as she did, and how to scale your marketing team as you grow. Hosted by David Mytton (Console) and Jean Yang (Akita Software). Things mentioned: Bitnami Railway Zed Hacker News Dagger Xata Y Combinator Reflect ChatGPT MacBook Pro Yeti Microphone LG UltraWide Monitors Microsoft Ergonomic Keyboard ABOUT ERICA BRESCIA Erica Brescia is the managing director at Redpoint Ventures, an early-stage venture fund, investing in primarily, enterprise software with a focus on DevTools and open source. Notable developer-first companies that they have invested in include HashiCorp, Snowflake, Stripe,  Twilio, and LaunchDarkly, among others. Prior to this, she spent close to 20 years as a founder and operator. She founded a company called Bitnami where she bootstrapped $1 million in funding. She was also the chief operating officer at GitHub. Highlights: [Erica Brescia]: If you look at the very early days of software development and open source in particular, we've gone from this real DIY kind of bespoke, “The cool thing to do is compile your own kernel,” to a focus on time optimization and “How can you build the best thing possible the fastest?” If I had to look at a theme, that's a theme that I think about a lot. It's no longer about doing everything yourself. Instead, it's about really open source and building on the work of others, right? Over 90% of software developed today is built on top of open source, and most things that you need, from a building blocks perspective, to build a new app already exist in many cases. So now it's about, “Hey, what tools are out there? How can I engage with the community? How can I learn from others? How can I participate in things whether it's Stack Overflow, or building and sharing code on GitHub, or discussing things and issues?” It's much more collaborative and intertwined. I think that allows people to build new things much more quickly. — [0:02:51 - 0:04:10] [Erica Brescia]: I think a lot of companies underestimate the amount of effort that is required in building a true open-source community, where you're getting folks contributing to the core of that project. That's a material investment. A good way to think about it is you're actually taking a lot of what you might traditionally spend on marketing and instead investing that in your team that supports the growth and health and engagement of this community, which is no small feat. Then you can use that to build awareness and a bottoms-up adoption of your software in a way that just sheer traditional marketing would never allow you to do. Then you can layer a sales motion on top of that. — [0:16:23 - 0:17:12] Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev

4 May 2023


Dev War Stories, with Steven Sinofsky (a16z, ex-Microsoft) - S04E01

Dev War Stories, with Steven Sinofsky (a16z, ex-Microsoft) - S04E01

In this episode, we speak with Steven Sinofsky, currently a board partner at Andreessen Horowitz and previously of Microsoft. We discuss what it was like shipping code at Microsoft in the early days, what he learned from Bill Gates, how it applies to software development today, what the big Windows 8 rewrite was like, and why the Copilot AI naysayers are completely wrong. Although the software landscape has changed dramatically since Steven’s early days at Microsoft in the 80s, he shares some of the lessons he learned along the way which are still as relevant today as they were back then.  Hosted by David Mytton (Console) and Jean Yang (Akita Software). Things mentioned: Microsoft Windows 8 Copilot  Cornell University IBM Halt and Catch Fire Apple Jon DeVaan Webflow Mythical Man-Month, The: Essays on Software Engineering Bill Gates “A Hard Line on Software” (Video) Jensen Harris Hardcore Software ChatGPT Bing ChatGPT on 60 Minutes M2 Mac Mini MacBook Air One Strategy: Organization, Planning, and Decision Making Substack ABOUT STEVEN SINOFSKY Steven Sinofsky is an investor, a board partner at Andreessen Horowitz, a general advisor, and a self-described “person-about-town” in Silicon Valley. Shortly after he graduated from Cornell University, he became a software design engineer at Microsoft back in 1989. In his time at the company, he oversaw six major releases of the full range of Office apps and servers in his role as a senior executive. He also worked on Windows 7 and the Windows 8 rewrite as the president of the Windows division. He is a co-author of the book One Strategy: Organization, Planning, and Decision Making, as well as the writer of Hardcore Software, a Substack newsletter about the rise and fall of the PC revolution. Highlights: Steven Sinofsky: Bill was super interesting. He was, in a sense, this very interesting combination of business strategy, product strategy, and technology strategy. And whenever he would really push it, he was most comfortable trying to be a technology strategist. And to him, that was all about architecture. And so architecture, if you read a book like Fred Brooks, Mythical Man-Month, architecture is everything. Architecture in software is like this Nirvana. — [0:22:37 - 0:23:08] Steven Sinofsky: And the beauty of how Apple managed their operating system was they just didn't add a lot of features. But we had a team five times as big, adding features every release, and it was just not getting— My measure of success is not “Did we get the release done?” but “Was it making people do new things with the product?” And Windows had long stopped doing that. The ecosystem of software and hardware had probably died around 2000. And so when it came time to do Windows 8 — and obviously Hardcore Software has the whole timeline and all this stuff — but the thing we really wanted to do was take the product and build on it and all the things that were great about it, but bring it into a new era of computing from top to bottom or what we said was “from the chipset to the experience". — [0:28:43 - 0:29:34] Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur Or by email: hello@console.dev

27 April 2023


Engineering Leadership, with Meri Williams - S03E10

Engineering Leadership, with Meri Williams - S03E10

In this episode we speak to Meri Williams an experienced CTO at scaleups like Moo, Monzo, and Healx. We discuss the role of technology leadership, what engineering managers can do to help their teams, how to best go about recruiting engineers, and whether engineering performance can be measured.  About Meri Williams Meri Williams is an experienced CTO from scaleups like Moo, Monzo, and Healx. An experienced CTO who has led and scaled technology organizations across a range of sectors including medtech, neo-banking, government, ecommerce, telco and manufacturing. A published author, international speaker and chair (co-curator & host) of The Lead Developer conference series which has expanded from starting in London in 2015 to now running in London, New York, Berlin and Austin, Williams regularly trains the Be a Brilliant People Developer workshop to level up technologists into excellent managers & coaches.  Other things mentioned: Moo Monzo Healx Kindred Drive Cate Huston DORA metrics reMarkable MacBook Air iPad Pro Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/geek_manager   Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-22.

11 August 2022


WebAssembly, with Connor Hicks (Suborbital) - S03E09

WebAssembly, with Connor Hicks (Suborbital) - S03E09

In this episode we speak to Connor Hicks, Founder of Suborbital, a serverless platform powered by WebAssembly. We discuss how WebAssembly works, when you’d use AssemblyScript rather than other languages which compile to WASM, the use cases for deploying WebAssembly on the backend, and how the dev, test, build, deploy, and observability cycle works when creating code in WebAssembly.  About Connor Hicks Connor Hicks is based in Ottawa, Canada, and is the founder of Suborbital Software Systems. Connor works primarily on security and distributed systems projects including the Suborbital family of open source projects, and formerly led research and development at 1Password. Connor is a strong believer in building security and privacy into the core of all software, and is exploring the next iteration of web service development with technologies like WebAssembly. Other things mentioned: Suborbital WebAssembly One password Wordpress Bytecode Alliance wasmtime Rust Go Shopify Cargo Trunk TinyGo Swift OpenTelemetry Hashicorp Nomad GoReleaser Caddy Elgato VS Code Discord Notion Firefox Miro Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/cohix   Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-11.

4 August 2022


VR, with Elena Kokkinara (Inflight VR) - S03E08

VR, with Elena Kokkinara (Inflight VR) - S03E08

In this episode we speak to Elena Kokkinara, CTO at Inflight VR, a VR platform developer for in-flight entertainment. We discuss how VR has developed over the last decade, how the body ownership illusion can make you feel like you have an entirely different physical body, whether developers can code in VR environments, and whether AR is in competition with VR.  About Elena Kokkinara Elena Kokkinara is CTO at Inflight VR, the first company that provides a VR entertainment solution for airplane passengers. Having completed a PhD in VR and published numerous papers on VR and computer vision, she is passionate about creating new experiences for Virtual Reality users and gamers. Her scientific interest is to explore the necessary parameters to design a flight-specific VR ecosystem. Other things mentioned: Inflight VR Unity Unreal Engine Oculus Cave HTC Flow Pico Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/redarahel   Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-26.

28 July 2022


Containers & Tests, with Sergei Egorov (Atomic Jar) - S03E07

Containers & Tests, with Sergei Egorov (Atomic Jar) - S03E07

In this episode we speak to Sergei Egorov, CEO of AtomicJar, the company behind TestContainers, a library that helps with integration testing for containerized applications. We discuss the challenges of developing container-based applications, how to orchestrate containers for testing, the future of cloud development environments, and whether the Apple M1 chip has come too late.  About Sergei Egorov Sergei Egorov is CEO & co-founder of AtomicJar - the company behind Testcontainers on a mission to make integration testing easy and enjoyable for developers. He is a Java Champion, an active member of the Open Source community, member of the Apache Foundation, and Reactive Foundation TOC. Other things mentioned: Docker Kubernetes   Google Cloud Run Heroku Josh Wong Twelve-Factor App Web Assembly Scaffold Buildpacks KO for GO LocalStack Lambda DynanoDB Quarkus GitHub Code Spaces MacBook Pro M1 Notion Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/bsideup Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-07.

21 July 2022


Data science, with Ines Montani (Explosion) - S03E06

Data science, with Ines Montani (Explosion) - S03E06

In this episode we speak to Ines Montani, co-founder and CEO of Explosion, a developer of Artificial Intelligence and Natural Language Processing technologies. We discuss how ML and NLP work behind the scenes, how developers should think about applied NLP, the common languages and frameworks used to build ML and NLP applications, and the challenges that come with running them at scale.  About Ines Montani Ines Montani is co-founder and CEO of Explosion. A software developer working on Artificial Intelligence and Natural Language Processing technologies, her company Explosion are makers of spaCy, one of the leading open-source libraries for Natural Language Processing in Python, and Prodigy, a modern annotation tool for creating training data for machine learning models. In 2020, Montani became a Fellow of the Python Software Foundation. Other things mentioned: Explosion spaCy Prodigy Tensorflow Hugging Face  Python Cypress Hyper Slack Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/_inesmontani  Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-06

14 July 2022


Security & Software Supply Chain, with Feross Aboukhadijeh (Socket) - S03E05

Security & Software Supply Chain, with Feross Aboukhadijeh (Socket) - S03E05

In this episode we speak to Feross Aboukhadijeh, CEO of Socket.dev, a software supply chain security company. We discuss the risks of using third party dependencies, how JS and NPM could improve their approach to security, whether trust in open source is eroding, and how to improve the overall security posture of your application.  About Feross Aboukhadijeh Feross is the founder and CEO of Socket, where he's working on a new approach to open source supply chain security. Feross is the author and maintainer of WebTorrent, StandardJS, and 100s of other open source projects which are downloaded 500+ million times per month. Feross is a lecturer at Stanford University where he teaches CS 253 Web Security. Socket, the company Feross started, is auditing every package on npm to detect suspicious changes and block software supply chain attacks. Hundreds of companies use Socket to protect their software applications and critical services from malware and security threats originating in open source code. Other things mentioned: Socket WebTorrent Standard JS npmJS Typescript Prettier Dependabot MacBook Pro M1 Studio display Logitech mouse Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/feross Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-06.

7 July 2022


Privacy Engineering, with Cate Huston (DuckDuckGo) - S03E04

Privacy Engineering, with Cate Huston (DuckDuckGo) - S03E04

In this episode we speak to Cate Huston, Engineering Director at DuckDuckGo. We discuss why developers should care about privacy, what technologies and tools are available for building privacy-driven features, how DuckDuckGo manages performance when doing lookups against tracker lists, and the full stack of privacy tools, from search to the browser to email. About Cate Huston Cate Huston is Engineering Director at DuckDuckGo and an advisor at Glowforge. She previously worked at Automattic, where she led the mobile, Jetpack, and Developer Experience teams. Huston admins the New-(ish) Manager Slack and writes regularly for Quartz. Other things mentioned: DuckDuckGo Automattic Smart Encryption Tracker radar 1Password DuckDuckBot Visual Studio Glowforge MacBook Pro M1 1Password Spotify Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/catehstn Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://twitter.com/catehstn  Recorded: 202-04-14.

30 June 2022


OSS & Investing, with Joseph Jacks (OSS Capital) - S03E03

OSS & Investing, with Joseph Jacks (OSS Capital) - S03E03

In this episode we speak to Joseph Jacks, founder and general partner at OSS Capital, a venture fund specializing in open source software. We discuss why open source is such an important differentiator for all software development, the philosophy behind open source, open core, and building a community around open source software, whether open source should be the default for all software. About Joseph Jacks Joseph Jacks is founder and general partner at OSS Capital, a fund that invests in Open Source projects. Previously, he was co-founder and VP of Technology Strategy of Kismatic which provided services for running Kubernetes at scale for enterprises. It was one of the top 0.01% of projects on GitHub and was acquired by Apprenda in May 2016. Jacks also founded the KubeAcademy, the parent organization of the official Kubernetes community conference KubeCon, and was the co-Founder and CEO of Aljabr which builds cloud-native data pipelines. Other things mentioned: OSS capital GitHub SourceForge Signal Richard Stallman Satoshi Nakamoto Linus Torvalds GitHub GitLab Red Hat Rode Sony A600 Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/josephjacks_ Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at:  https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-04.

23 June 2022


eBPF, with Liz Rice (Isovalent) - S03E02

eBPF, with Liz Rice (Isovalent) - S03E02

In this episode we speak to Liz Rice, Chief Open Source Officer at Isovalent, the company behind the open source eBPF product Cilium. We discuss why it’s such a revolutionary approach to developing low-level kernel applications, how BPF can be used for observability, networking and security, how developers should think about application security, and why all of these technologies are open source. About Liz Rice Liz Rice is Chief Open Source Officer at eBPF pioneers Isovalent, creators of the Cilium project, which provides cloud native networking, observability and security. Prior to Isovalent she was VP Open Source Engineering with security specialists Aqua Security. She is also Chair of the CNCF's Technical Oversight Committee, has co-chaired the KubeCon / CloudNativeCon and is an Ambassador for Open UK. Other things mentioned: Isovalent Berkeley lab Dave Thaler Kubernetes Firecracker Lambda M1 Macbook VS Code Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/lizrice Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-05-05.

16 June 2022


Dev infrastructure, with Guillermo Rauch (Vercel) - S03E01

Dev infrastructure, with Guillermo Rauch (Vercel) - S03E01

In this episode we speak to Guillermo Rauch, CEO of Vercel, a platform for globally distributed applications. We discuss the meaning of “developer experience”, how complexity is managed to help developers get started quickly but still be able to scale multiple systems, the role of monorepos and monolithic application architectures, and how to think about globally deployed serverless databases. About Guillermo Rauch Guillermo Rauch is CEO of Vercel. Before starting Vercel in November 2015, Guillermo was the CTO and co-founder of LearnBoost and Cloudup, acquired by Automattic in 2013. He is the creator of several popular Node.js open source libraries like Socket.io, Mongoose and Slackin. Prior to Node.js, he was a core developer of the MooTools frontend toolkit. Passionate about open source as an education medium, he is a former mentor of an Open Source Engineering class organized and pioneered by Stanford, with students from Harvard, MIT, Carnegie Mellon, UPenn, Columbia and others. Other things mentioned: Vercel NextJS Turbo Repo Copilot Neovim Edge functions SvelteKit MacBook Pro M1 Notion Slack GitHub Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/rauchg   Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2022-04-27.

9 June 2022


Season 3 - Devtools Interviews

Season 3 - Devtools Interviews

Starting with Vercel CEO, Guillermo Rauch on 9th June 2022, in season 3 of the Console DevTools Podcast we'll be speaking to 10 interesting people currently working in devtools about a specific technical topic. Upcoming guests: Dev Infra, with Guillermo Rauch (Vercel) BPF, with Liz Rice (Isovalent) OSS & Investing, with Joseph Jacks (OSS Capital) Privacy Engineering, with Cate Huston (DuckDuckGo) Security & Software Supply Chain, with Feross Aboukhadijeh (Socket) Data science, with Ines Montani (Explosion) Containers & Tests, with Sergei Egorov (Atomic Jar) VR, with Elena Kokkinara (Inflight VR) WASM, with Connor Hicks (Suborbital) Engineering Leadership, with Meri Williams (LabGenius, LeadDev & Kindred) Join David for our first episode, on 9th June 2022. In the meantime, subscribe to the Console newsletter for weekly reviews of the best 2-3 devtools. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton

25 May 2022


Developer experience, with Jean Yang (Akita) - S02E11

Developer experience, with Jean Yang (Akita) - S02E11

In this episode  we speak with Jean Yang, CEO of Akita Software, an API observability startup, which she founded after leaving her role in academia as a computer science professor. We discussed the software heterogeneity problem, why it isn't better to rewrite in rust and how the language wars have actually been won. We also explore how the big fight today is about infrastructure and why microservices are the solution to the ever-growing complexity of software. About Jean Yang Jean Yang is the founder and CEO of Akita Software, a developer tools company that is bringing structure to observability. Previously, Jean was a professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. Jean has a PhD from MIT, holds software tools patents from work at Microsoft Research and Facebook, and was selected as one of the MIT Technology Review's 35 Innovators Under 35 in 2016. Other things mentioned: Zenoss Taming Go’s Memory Usage, or How We Avoided Rewriting Our Client in Rust Splunk Datadog Prometheus Grafana The Everything store  Zapier Clay Zoom Bachelor - https://www.zoombachelor.com/ Zoom bachelorette Vim #PLTalk Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev. Recorded: 2021-11-19

17 March 2022


Terminal tools, with Michelle Lim & Zach Lloyd (Warp) - S02E10

Terminal tools, with Michelle Lim & Zach Lloyd (Warp) - S02E10

In this episode we speak to Michelle Lim and Zach Lloyd, both of Warp, a terminal designed to make developer workflows more productive. We discuss the historical significance of physical terminals, terminal emulators, pseudo-terminals and the shell. We also explore why Rust is a better technology choice than Electron for building a new terminal, why GPU acceleration matters, how it works with the macOS Metal APIs, and discuss the challenges garbage collection brings to high performance UIs. Get early access to Warp with this special invite code: https://app.warp.dev/download/r/1CNSLE About Michelle Lim & Zach Lloyd Zach Lloyd is the founder and CEO of Warp, a Rust-based terminal for developers. Michelle is a software engineer who joined early on. Prior to Warp Zach co-founded SelfMade, was CTO at Time Inc., and ran the Google Sheets team at Google. Michelle graduated from Yale and previously worked at Robinhood, Slack, and Facebook.  Other things mentioned: iTerm VT100 tmux Fish SSH bash GitHub Actions Rust Electron Garbage collection  OpenAl Metal Xcode OpenAi Codex Retool Keyron  CLion Logitech Ergo K8060 Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/michlimlim https://twitter.com/zachlloydtweets/ Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-11-02.

10 March 2022


Designing dev products, with Ellen Chisa (Boldstart) - S02E09

Designing dev products, with Ellen Chisa (Boldstart) - S02E09

In this episode we speak to Ellen Chisa, who was previously CEO of Dark, a programming language startup that allowed you to focus on your backend code and forget about frameworks, deployments, and infrastructure. We discuss whether that is the right way to think about coding, where no code or low code fits into the modern development stack, how developers should think about open source and the challenges of building dev tools versus getting developers to actually use them. About Ellen Chisa Ellen Chisa is a founder, angel investor, and engineer. She created Dark, a programming language coupled to its editor and infrastructure. Previously, she was the first employee at Lola, combining the best of technology and people for travel planning. Ellen Chisa is currently a Founder in Residence at Boldstart Ventures. Things mentioned: The Self Provisioning Runtime - Shawn Wang Bret Victor Chris Granger Lambdragon Future of Coding Steve Krouse Dark Visual Studio Code Azure Red Hat  MongoDB Elastic Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/ellenchisa Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-10-12.

3 March 2022


Web standards & privacy, with Desigan (Dees) Chinniah (Tor / Ex-Mozilla) - S02E08

Web standards & privacy, with Desigan (Dees) Chinniah (Tor / Ex-Mozilla) - S02E08

In this episode, we speak with Desigan Chinniah, previously at Mozilla, advisor to many web startups and now on the board of Tor. We discuss the evolution of web tech from websites to complex decentralized applications running on browser APIs, the competitiveness of the browser rendering engine versus the UX layer and how developers think about privacy. Does it live in browser settings, extensions or on the protocol core level? About Dees Chinniah Desigan Chinniah is a creative technologist. After two decades of dot-com checks in, Dees now has a portfolio of advisory roles (Ably, Coil, Replay, SEDNA, Zama) and board positions (Ushahidi, The Tor Project). He invests early into diverse and under-represented minority founders and is a mentor at Design Club, Mozilla and Seedcamp. Other things mentioned: Mozilla Figma VS Code HTML5 Gecko WebKit Brave Firefox Opera Edge Homomorphic encryption Replay Glitch Sourcegraph Desiganchinniah.com Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/cyberdees Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at:  https://console.dev .

24 February 2022


Dev communities, with Rosie Sherry (Orbit) - S02E07

Dev communities, with Rosie Sherry (Orbit) - S02E07

In this episode we speak to Rosie Sherry, Community Lead at Orbit, a community management software company. We discuss why community is not marketing, how devrel and community are different, who owns community and what that might mean with web3 & decentralization, and what essential tools you need for managing communities. About Rosie Sherry Rosie Sherry is Community Lead at Orbit, a community management software company. Prior to Orbit, Rosie founded the world’s largest testing community - Ministry of Testing - and led community at Indie Hackers. Things mentioned: Ministry of Testing Discord Slack luma Butter.us Notion Miro Rosieland Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/rosiesherry Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-10-21.

17 February 2022


Homomorphic encryption, with Rand Hindi (Zama) - S02E06

Homomorphic encryption, with Rand Hindi (Zama) - S02E06

In this episode we speak to Rand Hindi, CEO of Zama, an open source framework for securing AI applications in the cloud. We discuss the principles behind encryption, homomorphic encryption, and programmable bootstrapping, how these technologies can ensure user data privacy, what is changing that is making them more relevant to today, and how developers should be thinking about building on new protocols from HTTP to HTTPS to HTTPZ.  About Rand Hindi Dr Rand Hindi is an entrepreneur and deeptech investor. He is the CEO at Zama, an open source homomorphic encryption company, and an investor in 30+ companies. Prior to Zama he created Snips, the first edge-based, private by design voice solution for OEMs, which was acquired by Sonos in 2019. He has received the TR35 away from the MIT Technology Review, selected as a "30 under 30" by Forbes, is a lecturer at Sciences Po in Paris and is an advisor to multiple companies. He was previously a member of the French Digital Council where he focused on AI and Privacy issues. Things mentioned: Snips Zama Homomorphic encryption Programmable bootstrapping PyTorch TensorFlow WebAssembly Rust Confidential computing  Differential privacy  Solidity Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/randhindi Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-10-27.

10 February 2022


Devtools investing, with Ed Sim (Boldstart) - S02E05

Devtools investing, with Ed Sim (Boldstart) - S02E05

In this episode we speak to Ed Sim, Founder and General Partner of Boldstart, a venture investor specializing in DevTools and software. Ed has invested in developer-focused companies like Snyk, Slim.ai, and Jit Security. We discuss what engineers should think about when working on side projects, when and if they should seek out investors, how to pick the good ones, whether raising money is even needed, and what the role of open source is. About Ed Sim Ed is the Founder of Boldstart Ventures, a day-one partner and true believer for developer first and SaaS founders. Boldstart is a lead investor and often partners with technical founders at company formation, helping accelerate their path to product market fit. Ed is currently a board member/observer of Snyk, Kustomer, BigID, Blockdaemon, Env0, Dooly, and Cape Privacy. Other notable day-one investments include Superhuman, Security Scorecard, and Front. Ed previously co-founded Dawntreader Ventures where he led first round investments in LivePerson (NASDAQ: LPSN), GoToMeeting (acq. By Citrix), and Greenplum (acq. EMC/Pivotal). Ed has a BA in Economics from Harvard. Things mentioned: Snyk Slim.ai CodeSee Atomic Jar  Testcontainers Akamai SourceClear Node RubyGems DigitalOcean Atlassian Twilio GitLab Bitbucket Greenplum Eucalyptus Cape Privacy  Gavin Uhma Dropout Labs TensorFlow encrypted MongoDB Elasticsearch Red Hat JBoss Boldstart.vc What’s Hot in Enterprise IT/VC Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/edsim Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-10-15.

3 February 2022


Decentralization, with Brooklyn Zelenka (Fission) - S02E04

Decentralization, with Brooklyn Zelenka (Fission) - S02E04

In this episode we speak to Brooklyn Zelenka, CTO at Fission, a decentralized app framework for the future of web apps at the edge. We discuss the relevance of blockchain to web3 and decentralized web apps, why developers should avoid managing backend servers, the challenges of doing authentication and identity with local clients, and why web browser APIs are the place to build, not the native operating system.  About Brooklyn Zelenka Brooklyn is the Co-Founder and CTO at Fission, where her team is building the next generation of web dev tools for the future of computing on the edge - levelling the playing field for teams of all sizes. She founded the Vancouver functional programming meetup, and is the author of several Elixir libraries including Witchcraft & Exceptional. She was previously an Ethereum Core Developer, and continues to push the broader web3 space forward with standards like UCAN auth and the Webnative File System. Things mentioned: Twitter Bluesky IndexedDB Electron Google BigQuery  Starlink Cloud BigTable Apache Hadoop Amazon S3 Location transparency Decentralized Identity Foundation Restful API Elixir Elm Haskell Go Web Assembly Rust NixOS esbuild GNU Emacs Vim clutch Tailscale ElixirConf Discord Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/expede Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev   Recorded: 2021-10-26.

27 January 2022


Observability, with Charity Majors (Honeycomb) - S02E03

Observability, with Charity Majors (Honeycomb) - S02E03

In this episode we speak to Charity Majors, CTO at Honeycomb, an observability tool for distributed systems. We discuss why observability is based around events and not metrics, how developers should think about achieving appropriately observable systems, why Honeycomb implemented their own distributed columnar data store, and how you can delete most of your alerts by implementing service level objectives. About Charity Majors Charity Majors is an ops engineer and accidental startup founder at honeycomb.io. Prior to this she worked at Parse, Facebook, and Linden Labs. She is the co-author of O'Reilly's Database Reliability Engineering. Other things mentioned: MongoDB Postgres Scuba  High cardinality Druid Kafka AWS Lambda Zookeeper Appropriate observability Akita Software Sourcegraph Charity.wft Honeycomb blog Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/mipsytipsy Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-11-03.

20 January 2022


Security, with Thomas Ptacek (Fly.io) - S02E02

Security, with Thomas Ptacek (Fly.io) - S02E02

In this episode we speak to Thomas Ptacek, currently a software engineer at Fly.io and previously a co-founder at security firms Latacora and Matasano Security. We discuss the state of software security in sectors like energy and healthcare,  how software developers should think about supply chain risk, and what they should do about securing their dependencies. We also explore how security threats have changed over the years, and what developers working on open source should do to improve their own security. About Thomas Ptacek Thomas Ptacek is a leading security researcher. Best known as one of the co-founders of Matasano Security, which was prior to its acquisition by NCC Group one of the largest software security firms in the US. Working in software security since 1995, Thomas was a member of the industry’s first commercial vulnerability research lab - Secure Networks. Thomas is currently a software engineer at Fly.io Other things mentioned: Django NodeJS React Deno Okta Google cloud authentication Tailscale WireGuard Server-side request forgery Burp Suite Black Hat Emacs Tramp Mode Magit Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/tqbf Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev Recorded: 2021-10-19.

13 January 2022


Dev infrastructure, with John Graham-Cumming (Cloudflare) - S02E01

Dev infrastructure, with John Graham-Cumming (Cloudflare) - S02E01

In this episode we speak with John Graham-Cumming, CTO of Cloudflare, a global web platform built for security and performance. We discuss the philosophy behind the idea that the network is a computer, why developers should be able to ignore the low level details of where their code runs, and the challenges of deploying data centers on Mars. About John Graham-Cumming John Graham-Cumming is the CTO of Cloudflare and is a computer programmer and author. He studied mathematics and computation at Oxford and stayed for a doctorate in computer security. As a programmer, he has worked in Silicon Valley and New York, the UK, Lisbon, Germany, and France. His open source POPFile program won a Jolt Productivity Award in 2004. He is the author of a travel book for scientists published in 2009 called The Geek Atlas and has written articles for The Times, The Guardian, The Sunday Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, New Scientist, and other publications. Things mentioned: Apple silicon Arm IBM Intel Starlink Donald Knute Cloudflare Workers V8 Go Rust WebAssembly (Wasm) COBOL Green Compute Cloudflare Wrangler J programming language Raspberry Pi Jgc.org Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/jgrahamc Or by email: hello@console.dev About Console Console is the place developers go to find the best tools. Our weekly newsletter picks out the most interesting tools and new releases. We keep track of everything - dev tools, devops, cloud, and APIs - so you don’t have to.  Sign up for free at: https://console.dev. We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-11-24

6 January 2022


Season 2 - Devtools interviews

Season 2 - Devtools interviews

Starting with Cloudflare CTO, John Graham-Cumming on 6 Jan 2022, in season 2 of the Console DevTools Podcast we'll be speaking to 11 interesting people currently working in devtools about a specific technical topic. Upcoming guests: Dev infrastructure, with John Graham-Cumming (Cloudflare) Security, with Thomas Ptacek (Fly.io) Observability, with Charity Majors (Honeycomb) Decentralization, with Brooklyn Zelenka (Fission) Devtools investing, with Ed Sim (Boldstart) Homomorphic Encryption, with Rand Hindi (Zama) Dev communities, with Rosie Sherry (Orbit) Web standards & privacy, with Desigan (Dees) Chinniah (Tor / Ex-Mozilla) Designing dev products, with Ellen Chisa (Boldstart) Terminal tools, with Michelle Lim & Zach Lloyd (Warp) Developer experience, with Jean Yang (Akita) Join David for our first episode, on 6th January 2022. In the meantime, subscribe to the Console newsletter for weekly reviews of the best 2-3 devtools. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/consoledotdev https://twitter.com/davidmytton

9 December 2021


How do developers pick tools? (Cue & Leapp) - S01E10

How do developers pick tools? (Cue & Leapp) - S01E10

Episode 10 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Cue - 0pen source data validation language) Leapp (manage cloud access credentials) Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: JSON Go Protocol buffers Typescript F# Projects Julia Programming Language Akita Software AWS Identity and Access Management  Apache Subversion Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-08-19.

9 September 2021


Can you rely on autofix? (Tyk & DeepSource) - S01E09

Can you rely on autofix? (Tyk & DeepSource) - S01E09

Episode 9 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Tyk - API gateway Deepsource - automated code reviews Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: Kong Apigee nginx Go Akita Software EP5 Console DevTools Podcast EP2 Console DevTools Podcast Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-08-18.

2 September 2021


Decentralize your tech stack (Fission & AskGit) - S01E08

Decentralize your tech stack (Fission & AskGit) - S01E08

Episode 8 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Fission - decentralized app backend for storage and identity. AskGit - query git repos with SQL. Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: InterPlanetary File System WebAssembly Okta Everybody Lies Bogdan Vasilescu Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-08-17.

26 August 2021


Open source vs commercial: Appsmith & Retool - S01E06

Open source vs commercial: Appsmith & Retool - S01E06

Episode 6 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Appsmith - Open source internal tool UI builder Retool - Internal tool UI builder Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: MongoDB Amazon S3 GraphQL Stripe React Why Aren't There More Programming Languages Startups? Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-08-03.

12 August 2021


Snyk Open Source (dependency security monitoring) & Security Scorecard (security health metrics) - S01E05

Snyk Open Source (dependency security monitoring) & Security Scorecard (security health metrics) - S01E05

Episode 5 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Snyk Open Source - Dependency security monitoring. Security Scorecard - Security health metrics. Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: GNU C Library (glibc) Dependabot Ngnix Linux Foundation Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-07-27.

5 August 2021


Liveblocks (real-time collaboration API) & Livekit (open source live video and audio API) - S01E04

Liveblocks (real-time collaboration API) & Livekit (open source live video and audio API) - S01E04

Episode 4 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Liveblocks - real-time collaboration API. Livekit - Open source live video and audio API. Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: Figma. Mux. Next.js. NuxtJS. WebRTC. Redis. ohyay. Zoom Bachelor. Open Broadcaster Software. Agora. Twillio. Tuple. Splunk. Notion. Clubhouse. Discord. A16Z - The Cost of Cloud. Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-07-20.

29 July 2021


Automerge (conflict-free JSON-like data structure) & Polypane (browser testing tool) - S01E03

Automerge (conflict-free JSON-like data structure) & Polypane (browser testing tool) - S01E03

Episode 3 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Automerge - JSON-like data structure for concurrent writes. Polypane - Browser testing tool Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned Local-First Software - academic paper Syncthing vim Javascript Typescript WebAssembly SQLite Akita Software Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-07-13.

22 July 2021


GitHub Copilot (AI pair programming) & Tuple (screen sharing for developers) - S01E02

GitHub Copilot (AI pair programming) & Tuple (screen sharing for developers) - S01E02

Episode 2 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: GitHub Copilot - AI pair programming for VS Code. Tuple - Screen sharing optimized for developers. Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: Computer Aided Programming Group at MIT. Jean’s programming language research. GNU General Public License (GPL). Django. Ruby on Rails. Bootstrap. David’s sustainable computing research. Jean’s Twitch channel. Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-07-06.

15 July 2021


Waypoint (build, deploy, release) & Zellij (terminal workspace) - S01E01

Waypoint (build, deploy, release) & Zellij (terminal workspace) - S01E01

Episode 1 of the Console DevTools Podcast, a devtools discussion with David Mytton (Co-founder, Console) and Jean Yang (CEO, Akita Software). Tools discussed: Waypoint - Build, deploy, and release across platforms. Zellij - Terminal workspace manager (tabs + multiplexing). Find more interesting tools and beta releases for developers at https://console.dev Other things mentioned: HCL - Hashicorp Configuration Language. Vagrant. Terraform. Kubernetes. Gitpod. GitHub Codespaces. tmux. vim. Oh My ZSH. Fish. VS Code. Let us know what you think on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev Or by email: hello@console.dev We are always on the lookout for interesting tools to feature in the newsletter, so please say hello if you're working on something new or have recently used a tool you think we'd like. We only include things that would be of interest to experienced developers and do not accept payment for product inclusion. Read our selection criteria. Recorded: 2021-06-29.

8 July 2021


Season 1 Trailer

Season 1 Trailer

As software has become more important, so the demand for developers has increased. Whether you call yourself an engineer, a programmer, developer, hacker or coder, more and more organizations are building skilled technology teams to change how they achieve their mission. Developers make big decisions, yet they face an onslaught of sales and marketing combined with an unrelenting velocity of releases to keep up with. From open source, cloud, large public company or small startup, there has never been more choice for developers. That's why we started Console, a free weekly email digest of the best tools and beta releases for developers. Every Thursday we highlight two interesting developer tools, saying what we like and what we don’t like. And now we’re launching a podcast. We'll be kicking off with our first few episodes, each no more than 15 minutes, discussing the tools featured in the Console newsletter with David Mytton (Co-founder of Console) and Jean Yang, CEO of Akita Software. Jean earned her PhD in software correctness and programming language design from MIT and then became a professor in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University before she started Akita to build the future of API observability. So join Jean and David for our first episode, on 8th July 2021. And in the meantime, subscribe to the Console newsletter. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanqasaur https://twitter.com/davidmytton https://twitter.com/consoledotdev

15 June 2021

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