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Jeremy Clark: Design Patterns - Episode 270

Jeremy Clark: Design Patterns - Episode 270

Azure DevOps Podcast 6 November 2023

Episode Description

Jeremy helps developers by sharing his struggles, mostly in technology, but also with being more social as an introvert, understanding learning potential, and playing banjo. He has worked as a corporate developer, as a Chief Improvement Officer at a startup, and as a contract developer. Currently, he teaches developers through online courses, workshops, tech articles, and conference talks. He spends most of his time in C# and has recently ventured into Go (Golang) and Rust (Rust lang) to explore some of his favorite topics: interfaces, delegates, concurrency, and parallel programming. You can see him speaking next at LIVE! 360 in Orlando, FL Nov 12‒17, 2023. Use promo code “Clark” to save $500 off your ticket. Also Oct 23rd at DevSpaceConf in Huntsville, AL.

 

Design patterns are not just for architects. In fact, you already use Design Patterns but probably don’t know it. Observer, Facade, Iterator, Proxy — these are all patterns that allow us to better communicate our ideas with other developers. And once we understand the patterns, we can use solutions that people way smarter than we have already implemented. In this session, we’ll take a look at several Gang of Four patterns that we regularly use without realizing it. Don’t know who the Gang of Four is? Join us to find out.

 

Topics of Discussion:

[3:30] Jeremy talks about his foray into programming and the colleagues that helped him gain confidence.

[6:44] Jeremy went from speaking at smaller user groups and code camps to global conferences.

[7:35] The act of sharing gained expertise is what makes you an expert.

[10:10] Design patterns and their relevance in development.

[13:19] The importance of the Gang of Four book and Head First Design Patterns.

[17:24] Iterator and the patterns that fall in that category.

[20:43] Are we seeing classic patterns be redirected or are new ones taking shape?

[23:05] The concept of abstraction.

[24:10] The two states that developers fall into.

[28:02] More about Jeremy’s testing philosophy and how it’s changed over the years.

[29:26] What Jeremy prioritizes when helping other developers start a new codebase.

[32:34] Where people can go for more education and information on these topics.

 

Mentioned in this Episode:

Clear Measure Way

Architect Forum

Software Engineer Forum

Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.net.

Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor)

.NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon!

Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events!

Jeremy Clark Twitter

Jeremy Clark LinkedIn

Jeremy Bytes Blog

DevSpace Conf

 

Want to Learn More?

Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

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Damian Brady: GitHub Copilot - Episode 258

Damian Brady: GitHub Copilot - Episode 258

Damian Brady is a Developer Advocate Manager at GitHub. He's a developer, speaker, and author specializing in DevOps, MLOps, developer process, and software architecture. Formerly a Cloud Advocate at Microsoft for four years, and before that, a dev at Octopus Deploy and a Microsoft MVP, he has a 25-year background in software development and consulting in a broad range of industries. In Australia, he co-organized the Brisbane .Net User Group and launched the annual DDD Brisbane conference.   Topics of Discussion: [2:12] How did Damian get into the field? [5:50] What is GitHub Copilot, and what are some of the most impressive and time-saving features? [8:38] What is the model that GitHub Copilot uses? [10:32] How have they decided what code is appropriate for this model? [12:13] Damian talks about both the prompt engineering and the server side. [17:30] How do you know if your code is good code? [19:50] Damian shares some cool prompts he has seen in Copilot Chat. [26:10] Github Copilot Voice is an experimental tool, useful for people who find it hard to type or who can’t type. [32:48] The aim of Copilot is to basically increase your productivity, but increase your happiness as a developer as well. [34:40] Will this eventually take the job of all developers? [38:14] Whether it’s GitHub Copilot or a competitive tool that does AI programming, it’s just going to be the way that you do software engineering. [43:07] The difference between junior and senior developers.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.net Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Damian Brady on Twitter Damian Brady website GitHubNext CoPilot for Docs GitHubNext | Copilot for Pull Requests Copilot for CLI CoPilot Voice DDD Brisbane   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

14 August 2023


Glenn Burnside: Managing Developers - Episode 257

Glenn Burnside: Managing Developers - Episode 257

Glenn Burnside is the Principal Engineer at Skimmer. For 11 years, he was the Executive Vice President at Headspring until they were acquired by Accenture. Before that, he held a number of development management positions as well as leadership roles in the Boy Scouts and other community roles. Glenn holds an Executive MBA from Quantic School of Business and a Computer Engineering degree from Texas A&M University, where he held leadership positions in the Corps of Cadets, Company B-1. You can find more about Glenn at glennburnside.com.   Topics of Discussion: [3:48] Glenn shares a funny story of threatening to quit if he became a manager, and what it feels like to bug people about filling out their timesheets. [5:13] What Glenn realized about software team management and paving the way for others to grow. [9:03] Glenn talks about his thought process of adding someone to the team, whether it’s from scratch or adding someone to an existing team. [10:08] A concept from The Ideal Team Player, of finding someone that is humble, hungry, and smart. [13:14] Why Glenn asks to look for demonstrated ability or demonstrated actions from their prior history rather than answering a hypothetical question. [14:05] The STARR method: Situation, Task, Action, Resolution, Retrospective. [17:44] The importance of finding someone that can improve with you and learn as they go. [19:46] The younger generation of developers has skills but lacks confidence. [21:54] Gathering data points of the industry as a whole from outside your inner circle and place of employment. [23:07] You’ve got the great people on your team, now how do you get them to stay? [25:02] Keeping everybody aimed at the higher mission. [31:11] Having respect for the whole team, not just thinking of yourself as an individual player.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.net Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Glenn Burnside on LinkedIn Glenn Burnside   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

7 August 2023


Dennis van der Stelt: Microservices and Distributed Systems - Episode 256

Dennis van der Stelt: Microservices and Distributed Systems - Episode 256

Dennis van der Stelt is a Software Architect who loves building distributed systems and the challenges they bring. To be better than the day before, he continuously searches for new ways to improve his knowledge of architecture and software development. What he learns he tries to share via numerous articles, presentations, and posts on his blog. If you want to chat, feel free to ping Dennis on Twitter at @dvdstelt.   Topics of Discussion: [3:07] How did Dennis get into distributed systems? [5:24] Helping customers with building distributed systems. [7:00] Dennis describes the essence of distributed systems. [9:07] The role of asynchronous messaging between components in distributed systems. [12:38] Dennis shares a story about a panicked CEO when the database went down, and the lessons learned from the experience. [14:44] Starting with synchronous distribution, and then moving to asynchronous when you find the benefit. [16:05] The downsides of using asynchronous communication. [17:28] Who decides what happens when things go wrong? [22:34] What Amazon does right. [27:18] Microservices and event-driven architecture — Jeffrey has yet to find a microservices expert! [35:48] Thinking more about the domain model in vertical slices.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.net Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Particular Software Dennis on Github Dennis on Twitter Dennis van der Stelt   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

31 July 2023


Giorgi Dalakishvili: Beyond Relational Data with Entity Framework - Episode 255

Giorgi Dalakishvili: Beyond Relational Data with Entity Framework - Episode 255

Giorgi Dalakishvili is a software developer with more than a decade of experience. He works mainly with C#, ASP.NET MVC/ASP.NET Core, REST, WCF, Xamarin, Android, iOS, Entity Framework, Azure, SQL Server, and Oracle.   Giorgi is an open-source author and contributor on GitHub and a member of the .NET Foundation and InfoQ Editor.   Topics of Discussion: [3:33] Giorgi has worked with all the frameworks and libraries that Microsoft has come out with over the past 10‒15 years. He discusses using Entity Framework and starting his small speaking engagements. [5:12] Sessionize is a website where you can put out some different topics that you’d be willing to speak on, and just reach out to different user groups to take the plunge and do some public speaking for the first time. [6:03] Other types of data with Entity Framework beyond relational data, such as hierarchical data type from SQL Server. [8:49] How it simplifies your life. [9:28] What about JSON? Are there any limitations on the back-end database? [13:00] Is the support in EF Core 7.0 good enough to give a try if you’re going against SQL Server? [14:09] What other types of data are interesting to work with with Entity Framework? [14:36] Using geospatial data. What does it even look like? [18:30] Full text search, and how it’s different from a regular text search. [23:20] There are a lot of features to uncover in relational databases that we aren’t even aware of yet. [26:22] There are some problems and some tasks that are better solved with non-relational databases, but the majority can overlap between the two systems.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.net Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Giorgi Dalakishvili   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

24 July 2023


Mitchel Sellers: Architecting .NET MAUI - Episode 254

Mitchel Sellers: Architecting .NET MAUI - Episode 254

Mitchel Sellers is globally known as a 15-time Microsoft MVP, an ASPInsider, a DNN MVP, an MCP (Microsoft .NET, ASP.NET, and SQL Server), and CEO of IowaComputerGurus Inc. Sellers has a deep understanding of software development and, when speaking, focuses on proper architecture standards, performance, stability, security, and overall cost-effectiveness of delivered solutions. This message and his abilities resonate in the technical war room as well as the executive board room.   Mitchel is a prolific public speaker, presenting more than 400 sessions at user groups and conferences globally, such as DevUp, SDN, and Code PaLOUsa. Sellers has been the author of multiple books and a regular blogger on technology topics.   When Mitchel is not working in technology, you will find him flying his airplane, teaching others how to fly, or spending time with his family. He is also actively involved in the Open Source Community working diligently to further the movement.   Topics of Discussion: [3:02] Congrats to Mitchel on his election to a leadership position at the .NET foundation. [3:41] What is the .NET Foundation? [5:58] What about .NET Maui catches Mitchel’s attention, and is it really ready for us to go for it? [6:40] Official support for Xamarin Forms is going to be ending officially in early 2024. [8:48] The .NET Maui Blazor hybrid model. [10:22] What has been Mitchel’s experience pushing Maui applications to the various app stores? [13:00] The most applicable patterns when you are laying out the spread of a Maui application. [16:10] The preference for a centralized location. [21:49] The tendency to overlook analytics. [22:57] What does the analytics and telemetry suite look like, and what are the users doing with the application? [25:01] Tools like App Insights from Azure can be awesome, but they can also get very expensive. [27:10] What is the DevOps story for Maui applications these days from continuous integration and automated testing to deployments and versioning? [31:12] Using GitHub actions, which of the steps require certain operating-system-hosted agents? [34:37] What is next for Maui, both traditional and using the Blazor hybrid? [37:40] Where can we find Mitchel next?   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.net Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Mitchel Sellers .NET Foundation Architect Forum Clear Measure Way GitHub Mitchel Sellers .NET Maui + GitHub Actions Mobile Sync   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

17 July 2023


Mike Brind on Razor Pages in Action - Episode 253

Mike Brind on Razor Pages in Action - Episode 253

Mike Brind spent the first 20 years of his working life in a series of successful sales and marketing roles, towards the end of which he was introduced to HTML and databases. A dormant inner geek took over and Mike became very much more interested in developing websites than selling advertising space on them.   As well as books such as those in the Wrox Beginner series, Mike became reliant on the enormous amount of free help provided by online communities while he learned his new craft. Mike is now one of the all-time leading contributors to the official ASP.NET forums at http://forums.asp.net and is also a moderator there.   As a result of his contributions to the ASP.NET community via the forums, and through his technical article site at http://www.mikesdotnetting.com, Mike received the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) Award for ASP.NET from 2008 to 2018. Beginning ASP.NET Web Pages with WebMatrix is Mike’s first book.   Topics of Discussion: [3:06] How did Mike decide to leave school to become a programmer? [5:42] Jeffrey and his son are programming their own video game! [7:17] What sparked his interest in Razor and writing his new book, ASP.NET Core Razor Pages in Action? [9:51] What is the framework that Mike uses in his day-to-day job? [10:37] How would Mike classify the types of websites or web applications that are perfect for Razor pages, and maybe had some difficulties with other frameworks? [14:16] Are there any commonalities that you lose if you do the application with Razor pages and not MVC? [16:32] How does Mike organize his feature folders? [18:12] How Mike organizes test libraries and test cases. [20:06] What has been Mike’s experience with Playwright? [21:02] What’s coming in the future of Razor and Blazor? [24:39] The modernization jump for people who have old classic ASP applications is Razor pages.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.net Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET ASP.NET Core Razor Pages in Action Learn Razor Pages   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

10 July 2023


Brian Lagunas on Establishing Quality - Episode 252

Brian Lagunas on Establishing Quality - Episode 252

Brian Lagunas is a Microsoft MVP, a Microsoft Patterns & Practices Champion, leader of the Boise .Net Developers User Group (NETDUG), board member of Boise Code Camp, speaker, trainer, and Pluralsight author. He can be found speaking at a variety of developer events around the world. His talks always involve some form of markup (XAML or HTML), as well as how to build well-architected applications with Prism. In his spare time, he authors courses for Pluralsight, blogs, livestreams about various technologies, and manages the Prism Library. The easiest way to find Brian is on Twitter at @BrianLagunas.   Topics of Discussion: [2:21] High points in Brian’s career that have shaped his way of thinking about software, including starting his career at a global infrastructure company construction company. [5:22] The mentor that taught Brian about the importance of getting your foundation right. [7:11] How today’s development mindset is different. [8:40] How does Brian balance or reason those competing pressures from the outside? [9:52] Delivering quality first and creating a long-term plan for the team. [12:43] Fixing problems with the software versus working on new capabilities. [15:56] Brian’s approach when he took the team over, and how he handled any resistance and pushback by showing his team firsthand better efficiency and productivity. [16:26] How Brian measured actual progress. [21:02] The value of having a subjective opinion. [22:30] What quality controls does Brian put in place? [25:42] The issue Brian and his team found. [27:51] What kind of skills did Brian have to employ to make this level of testing possible? [29:15] The importance of everyone being open to helping and learning from each other and helping out where they can. [29:50] How Brian thinks about pull requests. [32:14] Stay tuned for Brian’s thoughts on static analysis. [33:41] The emotional side of things and how people feel about their work when they are focused more on development and spending less time fighting fires.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Brian Lagunas — Ep #228 Improve Pull Request Descriptions Using Templates Continuous Integration: Improving Software Quality and Reducing Risk, by Paul M. Duvall, Steve Matyas, and Andrew Glover   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

3 July 2023


Kevin LaBranche: Leading teams through DevOps - Episode 251

Kevin LaBranche: Leading teams through DevOps - Episode 251

Kevin is a software developer who finds great joy in teaching and learning from others. He’s been honing my craft for over two and a half decades. If he’s not in code, he’s near it. Kevin is often working on practices and processes that improve the engineering excellence of the team.   Currently, Kevin is in an architecture/lead development position at Northern Arizona University. He develops best practices tailored to the team and company culture. Kevin is a strong believer in applying systems thinking to all he does.   Topics of Discussion: [2:13] How Kevin discovered his passion for software, and proof you can be successful even if you are bad at math! [4:51] Kevin loves giving back to others by offering his mentorship. [5:15] How we can adjust to a changing culture. [8:09] The evolution of his DevOps team. [12:11] The idea of being able to read the code. [13:06] How do you start the DevOps journey? [15:05] What is a build script? Why is it important, and what are the most important components that need to be in the build script, in Kevin’s opinion? [20:16] What are the items that Kevin likes to make sure are in the DevOps environment when developers are starting a new application? [23:00] Creating a new web application in an existing environment vs. a new environment. [27:12] The importance of getting value out the door. [29:41] Safe database deployment, safe database changes. [32:45] Kevin’s chosen practice for using toggling and deprecating feature flags along with some of his favorite tools and libraries. [34:01] Protecting against API changes with third-party services.   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Architect Forum   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

26 June 2023


Greg Leonardo: Responsible AI - Episode 250

Greg Leonardo: Responsible AI - Episode 250

Greg is a Cloud Architect that assists organizations with cloud adoption and innovation and is currently a Public Cloud Architect at AT&T. He has been working in the IT industry since his time in the military and is a developer, teacher, speaker, and early adopter. Greg has worked in many facets of IT throughout his career and is currently the president of TampaDev, a community meetup that runs #TampaCC and various technology events throughout Tampa. Greg holds a certification as a Microsoft Certified Azure Solutions Architect Expert, and Microsoft Certified Trainer, and is an Azure MVP.   Topics of Discussion: [3:01] Greg talks about being a military veteran from the first Gulf War and then transitioning into the technology arena. [3:33] Giving back to the veteran community. [6:04] Is AI inherently irresponsible? [6:30] Greg defines responsible AI. [7:02] Thinking about AI as your personal assistant, but only presenting you with the facts. [8:53] The difference between the public models set out by the big companies, and the other aspect of creating your own model by choosing your own set of data using the GPT technology to analyze that data. [16:43] Hallucinations in AI and GPT models. [17:10] What is actionable right now for developers when they are designing it so that we can have some safeguards built in? [21:55] The difference between fact and affirmation. [23:41] The system shouldn’t just give us what we want, but it should be able to route that want into something that’s factual. [33:10] The design process for developers that want to create their own model. [37:11] Does Greg have any Chat GPT models?   Mentioned in this Episodes: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Architect Forum “Architecting For Azure with Greg Leonardo”   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

19 June 2023


Matthew Renze: AI Ethics - Episode 249

Matthew Renze: AI Ethics - Episode 249

Matthew Renze is a data science consultant, author, and public speaker. He is the founder of Renze Consulting, an AI consulting company that has trained over 500,000 software developers and IT professionals. His clients range from small tech start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. He is also the President of Serenze Global, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to improving access to technology education for under-represented individuals by empowering the next generation of tech community leaders. Matthew is currently working on his Master’s degree in Artificial Intelligence with a Data Science specialization at Johns Hopkins University. He currently has double degrees in Computer Science and Philosophy with a minor in Economics from Iowa State University. He is a Microsoft MVP in AI, an ASPinsider, and an author for Pluralsight, Udemy, and Skillshare. His interests include AI, ML, data science, mindfulness, technology education, and tech community leadership.   Topics of Discussion: [1:41] How Matthew got into software development and eventually AI, rebranding himself as a data scientist and then AI consultant. [5:40] Matthew is getting his Master’s Degree in Artificial Intelligence. [6:04] How can we demystify AI and all the buzzwords we use? [9:13] Are there any current products that meet the definition of strong general AI? [11:03] What does weak general AI mean? [13:51] For .NET developers, what can they actually do today, with this latest generation of generative AI? [17:02] What are some examples in AI right now that Matthew has come across that clearly violate any standard of ethical boundary? [19:00] A few of the issues with AI currently or ways that AI systems are being abused: AI hallucination AI-generated misinformation Algorithmic bias and discrimination Lack of trust in AI Recommendation engines (rabbit holes) Lack of basic AI literacy [22:00] Is it even possible for these models not to be biased? [22:35] We have to make sure that we’ve got balanced data sets in order to get the models to train properly. [25:41] How do we regulate ethics? [27:55] The distinction between using supervised learning, and then self-supervised learning, or reinforcement learning. [39:20] How we can prevent deep fake videos. [42:01] It’s important to get these tools in the hands of the right people, provide education, and move forward mindfully. [47:02] Curating your own algorithm and handling information overload. Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Architect Forum Matthew Renze Developing Your AI Strategy Matthew's Website Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

12 June 2023


Sagar Lad: Data DevOps and Security - Episode 248

Sagar Lad: Data DevOps and Security - Episode 248

Sagar Lad is a Technical Solution Architect with a leading multinational software company and has deep expertise in implementing Data & Analytics solutions for large enterprises using Cloud and Artificial Intelligence. He is an experienced Azure Platform evangelist with 9+ Years of IT experience and a strong focus on driving cloud adoption for enterprise organizations using Microsoft Cloud Solutions & Offerings. He loves blogging and is an active blogger on Medium, LinkedIn, and the C# Corner developer community. He was awarded the C# Corner MVP in September 2021 for his contributions to the developer community. He’s also the author of three books, Mastering Databricks Lakehouse Platform, Azure Security for Critical Workloads, and Hands-On Azure Data Platform.   Topics of Discussion: [2:57] Sagar talks about the critical points in his career that led him to technology. [6:01] What turned Sagar on to a love of data? [8:39] With so much technical jargon out there, how do you simplify? [12:40] What is Data Lakehouse? [13:25] What are some common scenarios where Data Lakehouse can be really valuable? [18:53] What does unit testing mean in the data bricks world? [22:10] How long does it take to run the tests in Azure? [25:42] What’s the most expensive Databricks environment that Sagar has seen on a monthly basis? [27:54] What are some of the things that are being missed around the industry? [31:42] Sagar says that when we talk about security, there are seven layers.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Clear Measure Architect Forum Sagar Lad books on Amazon Certifications: Sagar Lad on Credly LinkedIn: Sagar Lad on LinkedIn Twitter: @AzureSagar (Twitter: Sagar Lad) Medium: Sagar Lad on Medium   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

5 June 2023


René Schumacher: The DevOps Mindset - Episode 247

René Schumacher: The DevOps Mindset - Episode 247

René is a Principal Cloud Solution Architect - Engineering (CSA-E) and technical lead for Azure DevOps and software development processes at Microsoft in Germany. In his role as CE, he helps customers adopt good development practices and processes as well as understanding the principles of DevOps. As an Azure DevOps expert, René trains customers in using the DevOps toolchain and shows ways to integrate Azure DevOps into existing heterogeneous environments.   Before his start at Microsoft in late 2008, René had been working as a developer of enterprise logistic systems for almost ten years.   Topics of Discussion: [3:05] René’s start of his career and how he got into programming. [5:20] How does René define the real difference between the 1990s waterfall mindset and the agile mindset, just from a process perspective? [7:49] How DevOps is an evolution of Agile. [9:13] What is DevOps all about? [11:29] The three ways of DevOps as described in The Phoenix Project: Maximize flow or system thinking. Amplify feedback loops. The culture of continuous experimentation and learning. [16:52] The importance of creating a natural cadence in your iteration. [17:16] What’s the best way to standardize across different teams? [21:13] Choosing the right tool at the right point in time. [24:10] What type of test automation does René find himself recommending? [27:50] To René, the most important thing is to get your code right. In addition, unit testing also has a very positive impact on your architecture and design because you're building a testable product. [28:50] What is Rene’s view on open telemetry in a DevOps mindset?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Clear Measure Architect Forum The Phoenix Project book: A Novel about IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win, by Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, and George Spafford Test-driven development: By Example, by Kent Beck Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change, by Kent Beck and Cynthia Andres The Unicorn Project: A Novel about Developers, Digital Disruption, and Thriving in the Age of Data, by Gene Kim The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, by Frederick Brooks Jr. The Art of Unit Testing: With examples in JavaScript, by Roy Osherove Site Reliability Engineering: How Google Runs Production Systems, by Jennifer Petoff, Niall Murphy, Betsy Beyer, and Chris Jones   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

29 May 2023


Toi Wright: Blazor WebAssembly - Episode 246

Toi Wright: Blazor WebAssembly - Episode 246

Toi B. Wright is an independent consultant who has been working as a software developer for over 25 years. She has a BS in Computer Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an MBA from Carnegie Mellon University. She has been a Microsoft MVP in ASP/ASP.NET since 2005. She is also an ASPInsider. Ms. Wright is the author of two editions of Blazor WebAssembly by Example: A project-based guide to building web apps with .NET, Blazor WebAssembly, and C#. She is also the author of other .NET books and training courses.   Ms. Wright was the organizer of the original We Are Microsoft — Charity Challenge Weekend, www.wearemicrosoft.com, which was the precursor to Give Camps Everywhere. She is the Founder of the Dallas ASP.NET User Group, www.dallasasp.net. She has been involved with various user groups around Dallas since 1994 and has been running one or more user groups since 2000. She most recently helped organize the new Geeks in Pink group. This group supports women in technology.   Topics of Discussion: [3:46] What got Toi into web development? [8:17] What inspired Toi to write a book, and what is it about this version of Blazor web application technology on top of .NET that just that really captivated her? [10:54] What’s new in the second version of Blazor web assembly? [13:21] What can people expect now, using Visual Studio and debugging with Blazor WebAssembly? [15:01] Are there specific things that are in a Blazor project that people need to think about when it comes to secure web applications? [17:34] Does Toi know the state of the component vendors out there for web assembly? And do all those components work in the web Assembly version? [20:10] What is Toi’s favorite hosting model? [22:59] More about Blazor Unity, and what Toi is excited about most for the future. [28:15] What does Toi think the “normal” .NET application is going to be with all of these choices?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Toi Wright Toi on Twitter Blazor WebAssembly By Example: Use practical projects to start building web apps with .NET 7, Blazor WebAssembly, and C#, 2nd Edition   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

22 May 2023


Ryan Booz- Modern Databases - Episode 245

Ryan Booz- Modern Databases - Episode 245

Ryan is an Advocate at Redgate focusing on PostgreSQL. Ryan has been working as a PostgreSQL advocate, developer, DBA, and product manager for more than 20 years, primarily working with time-series data on PostgreSQL and the Microsoft Data Platform.   Ryan is a long-time DBA, starting with MySQL and Postgres in the late ’90s. He spent more than 15 years working with SQL Server before returning to PostgreSQL full-time in 2018. He’s at the top of his game when he's learning something new about the data platform or teaching others about the technology he loves.   Topics of Discussion: [1:23] Ryan’s background and his love of helping people with their data. [6:06] What are some features of Postgres that really intrigued Ryan? [6:12] What are some of the choices in the database world that people should be well versed in? [11:00] Is there a marketplace for these extensions? [15:00] Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and many others have been very interested over the last 3‒4 years in the open-source code base. [15:50] Is there any environment or platform where Postgres can’t run? [17:24] Can we use a downsized database engine? [19:19] Ryan discusses Amazon Redshift. [23:58] What’s the state of the modern Redgate tools? [26:42] What are the top three tools developers should reach for? [27:00] What are the features of Flyway?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Ryan Booz Ryan on Sessionize Flyway   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

15 May 2023


Maddy Montaquila: MAUI applications in .NET 7  - Episode 244

Maddy Montaquila: MAUI applications in .NET 7 - Episode 244

Maddy Montaquila is a Senior Product Manager on the .NET MAUI team and has been working with .NET mobile apps since 2018 working on Xamarin tooling. When she first joined Microsoft and worked with the Xamarin team as an intern, she realized the impact that she could have in creating amazing developer tools and frameworks, which inspired her to pursue a role as Program Manager. You can connect with her on Twitter and GitHub @maddymontaquila!   Topics of Discussion: [4:21] How did Maddy get lucked into development and the mobile side of product management? [7:39] You can distill product manager roles to the intersection of the technology and what’s possible, the business, what’s going to make you money, and what your customers actually want and need. [9:17] Why is it important for program managers to have at least some coding background? [10:41] When people dive into Maui, what can they expect right now? [15:44] What tools or resources does someone need to get started, and what are the limitations? [20:44] What is the current DevOps story for going from a developer workstation all the way through testing and packaging, and then finally delivering it to the App Store? [23:47] Is there a favorite deployed test framework? [27:26] Why does Maddy prefer sometimes to work in Xaml? [29:17] If you’re going to reach for controls right now, is everything that they need built-in? What is the status of DevExpress? [37:03] It’s a great time to be a .net developer!   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NetMaui Maddy on LinkedIn .NET Multi-Platform App .Net Maui Samples .Net Maui Development   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

8 May 2023


Andy Roberts: Data in a Development World - Episode 243

Andy Roberts: Data in a Development World - Episode 243

Andy is a Data Platform and AI Architect at Microsoft, where he has worked for over 24 years. A long time ago, his father dropped two books on his desk and said: "Andy, I need you to be an SQL Expert for a meeting tomorrow. Can you handle that?" Recently out of college, he was still accustomed to cramming for an exam, so he showed up the next day, won the project, and began his new life as a “data guy.”   Since then, he’s “been around the (data) block.” Whether a developer, database analyst, architect, project lead, or more recently a part of a sales organization, the heart of his job has always revolved around data: acquiring it, shaping it, moving it, protecting it, using it to predict future outcomes, processing it efficiently, etc.   Topics of Discussion: [4:56] Andy has always grown up with computers around and has his father to thank for a lot of it. [6:39] What is it that causes some developers to say, I want to write code, but I don’t want to mess with the database? [14:29] What does Andy’s job as an AI architect look like? [16:19] When you have that predictive function with something to host it, that’s where AI happens and when intelligence starts happening in your application. [17:16] The importance of pre-trained models in machine learning. [20:00] What is reinforcement learning? [20:58] Why are we calling some things artificial intelligence and other things, not AI? [24:44] Andy gives his advice for those new to writing software and in developing. [29:08] What is a data lake? [31:48] The importance of thinking about the database as part of the application, not a separate thing.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Andy Roberts LinkedIn Architect Forum   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

1 May 2023


Donovan Brown is Retiring -  Episode 242

Donovan Brown is Retiring - Episode 242

Donovan Brown is a Partner Program Manager in the Azure CTO Incubations team at Microsoft. The Incubations team focuses on forward-looking development and innovation to facilitate the development of new projects and ideas. Before joining Microsoft, Donovan spent seven years as a Process Consultant and a Certified Scrum Master. Donovan has traveled the globe helping companies develop solutions using agile practices in many industries. Donovan is an avid programmer, often finding ways to integrate software into his other hobbies and activities.   Topics of Discussion: [7:37] Why is Donovan retiring? [8:49] Donovan talks about redefining his success and the decision he and his wife made to go live the life they want to live. [12:03] Living paycheck to paycheck is a bad idea, regardless of how big the paycheck is. [14:02] The importance of paying yourself first and making good money choices. [17:50] If it’s putting money in your pocket, it’s an asset. Some houses are assets, while others are liabilities. [18:36] Your money is your number one employee. [23:42] Donovan gives his thoughts on inflation. [31:00] Donovan gives advice for those early on in their career in both programming and making wise money decisions, including avoiding credit card debt. [31:26] The importance of being tenacious despite not having a degree or experience. [40:47] Donovan encourages programmers to learn a language that allows them to dabble in all different platforms.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Ep 002 with Donovan Ep 219 with Donovan   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

24 April 2023


Tim Corey: Learning Programming - Episode 241

Tim Corey: Learning Programming - Episode 241

Tim learned software development the hard way, with lots of dead-ends, confusion, and knowledge gaps. He kept thinking, “It shouldn’t be this hard!”   Now he teaches students how to think and code like professional developers. His goal is to make it easier for others to become a developer. He’s been recognized as a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional every year since 2017.   Topics of Discussion: [:45] How Tim actually got into development at the young age of 12. [6:17] How Tim got over the feeling of not being good enough. [7:55] How Tim got into teaching. [9:42] Tim built his YouTube channel slowly to find a consistent release schedule and passionate audience. [12:55] How to know what language to start in. [19:53] Why Tim is less of a fan of college and why he doesn’t recommend it. [22:26] Coding Boot Camps vs. self-paced courses. [27:47] Tim’s advice for young programmers suffering from impostor syndrome. [33:12] Every application has two jobs: capture information and display information. [38:01] What are a few of Tim’s favorite courses now, and what are universities doing right?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Tim Corey Tim Corey YouTube   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

17 April 2023


Bojan Magusic: Azure Security  - Episode 240

Bojan Magusic: Azure Security - Episode 240

Bojan Magusic is a Product Manager on the Customer Acceleration Team and acts as a technology expert for Fortune 500 companies to help them realize the full value of Microsoft Defender for Cloud and improve their overall security posture. He has a strong passion for cybersecurity, advancing women in tech and professional development. He is very interested in building partnerships with other companies to learn how they support, advance, and retain their cyber talent. In addition to various technical certifications (18-plus and counting), he also has received certifications from INSEAD and Kellogg School of Management. Bojan resides in Dublin (Ireland), where he is living the dream!   Topics of Discussion: [:37] Jeffrey puts out a call for those who would like to work with him. [4:15] Bojan talks about his book, Azure Security, and what we can expect. [5:09] Is security a job title? Where does it intersect with programming? [9:22] What is specifically Azure security, and how is it different from general cybersecurity? [11:44] Azure Security is practical while still having theoretical concepts that make it easier for folks who are not security engineers. [13:15] What specifically should development teams be looking at? [14:33] Defense in depth speaks about how you can minimize the overall risk to your environment by deploying multiple layers of security. [19:36] What is security hygiene? [25:25] What are Bojan’s favorite tools for static analysis security vulnerabilities? [27:45] Why you need to make security part of the software development lifecycle. [26:25] Bojan talks about the Microsoft DevOps Security Extension.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Azure Security — code for 45% off azuresec45 Bojan Magusic LinkedIn   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

10 April 2023


Thomas Vitale- Kubernetes - Episode 239

Thomas Vitale- Kubernetes - Episode 239

Thomas Vitale is a software engineer and architect specializing in building cloud-native, resilient, and secure enterprise applications. He designs and develops software solutions at Systematic, Denmark, where he’s been working on modernizing platforms and applications for the cloud-native world, focusing on developer experience and security.   Topics of Discussion: [3:52] How did Thomas get into software development? [6:00] Thomas talks about his book, Cloud Native Spring in Action. [7:31] Thomas goes over the basics of Kubernetes. [8:42] What about orchestration of all these containers in a production scenario? How can we distribute these containers across the machines? [12:11] How do we know when we need more than one Kubernetes cluster? [19:46] What are a node and a pod, and how do those two relate? [24:05] How does the application know when Kubernetes might move one container to a pod that happens to be on a different virtual machine with a different IP address? [27:36] Where does Docker Swarm fit in, and where does Helm fit in? [33:12] Thomas explains why he likes Carvel as a tool. [34:12] What is Thomas’s favorite method for spinning up your own Kubernetes cluster locally?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Thomas Vitale LinkedIn Thomas Vitale Website Cloud Native Spring in Action   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

3 April 2023


Chris Sainty: Blazor in Action - Episode 238

Chris Sainty: Blazor in Action - Episode 238

Chris is a Microsoft MVP, author, and software engineer with over 17 years of experience with ASP.NET. Passionate about sharing his knowledge with the community, he regularly writes both for his own blog as well as others — such as Visual Studio magazine, Progress Telerik, and StackOverflow. This passion for blogging led to his first book, Blazor in Action, a practical guide to building Blazor applications. He also maintains several popular open-source projects under the GitHub organization, Blazored. When not tapping on a keyboard, Chris is a keen speaker, having delivered talks at both user groups and conferences all over the world.   Topics of Discussion: [1:15] Jeffrey puts out a call for those who may be looking to work with him. [4:41] What was Chris’s start in the industry? [10:07] Chris talks about falling in love with Blazor and why he is so passionate about it. [12:10] Chris shares how he got into blogging and why he thinks it should be for everyone, not just those at the senior level. [15:22] Talks about winning the Microsoft MVP award. [15:48] How does Chris talk about Blazor when creating a new application? Are there defaults that he goes to? [21:51] Chris talks about his organizational technique on the client side. [25:05] In Chris’s book, Blazor In Action, he talks about GitHub repositories that he likes. [27:04] Structuring web APIs from a security perspective. [28:00] How does Chris segment different projects? [33:47] What is Chris’s favorite method of putting together an authentication flow?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Chris Sainty Website Chris Sainty LinkedIn Chris Sainty YouTube Chris Sainty Microsoft Blazor In Action Blazor In Action on Manning.Com - PBSAINTY for 50% off Blazored on GitHub   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

27 March 2023


Toni Solarin-Sodara: Developer Tools for Test Automation - Episode 237

Toni Solarin-Sodara: Developer Tools for Test Automation - Episode 237

Toni Solarin-Sodara is a Software Engineering Lead at Microsoft. He specializes in developer tooling, working at the client platform layer, and building the runtime libraries and tools that enable shipping code to various operating systems and devices. Toni is also the creator and lead maintainer of Coverlet, a cross-platform code coverage framework for .NET, with support for line, branch, and method coverage.   Topics of Discussion: [1:23] Jeffrey puts out a call for some opportunities to work with him! E-mail jeffrey@clear-measure.com to get more info. [4:05] What led to Toni’s career in development and programming? [5:18] What went into the .NET runtime contribution (native AOT)? [8:16] One thing Toni is quite proud of is being able to build native libraries by using the technology. [9:08] AOT stands for ahead-of-time compilation. [10:23] What is Coverlet and why does it work? [15:13] In what areas does Coverlet work very well? [15:27] A good chunk of what Coverlet does is allow transparency in the build system integration. [16:41] What’s the process for taking multiple runs of multiple test suites and getting them into one report? [23:53] What is Toni’s view on how the code coverage results should be used? [24:47] How do you get code coverage results when the actual test project is running on a different server? [30:46] What does Pose do and why is it useful?  [41:08] Toni says that .NET is actually pretty extensive, even as a programming language workbench. [41:40] What are expression trees?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps .NET Pose Coverlet   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

20 March 2023


Grant Fritchey: SQL Server Performance Tuning - Episode 236

Grant Fritchey: SQL Server Performance Tuning - Episode 236

A Microsoft Data Platform MVP, Grant Fritchey works for Red Gate Software as a Product Advocate. Grant has more than 30 years of experience in the industry as a DBA and developer. Grant is an active participant in the SQL Server Central discussion forums. He writes articles for SQL Server Central and Simple-Talk. He blogs regularly at scarydba.com. Grant is the author of several books including SQL Server Query Performance Tuning and SQL Server Execution Plans. Grant teaches classes on data management and databases around the world. He teaches in the smallest user group settings and at the largest events.   Topics of Discussion: [2:24] How did Grant get into the industry? [5:40 Are there any big shifts that more recent developers and all developers need to know about shifts in how databases have worked? [13:10] What should developers know about the ecosystem when you’ve taken a system and broken it up into multiple applications? [16:07] What has changed in Grant’s book, Query Performance Tuning? [20:34] Performance comes down to the code. It always comes down to the code. [23:58] What are some of the main tools that developers should have in their toolbox? [26:20] Why Grant recommends Extended Events and Query Store. [32:41] Grant gives us his sales pitch. [38:40] What does Grant think the future looks like?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Query Performance Tuning ScaryDBA.com SQL   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

13 March 2023


Christoph Vollmer: Automated Testing Techniques - Episode 235

Christoph Vollmer: Automated Testing Techniques - Episode 235

Christoph Vollmer is an internationally experienced IT Manager with strong experience in software development and team leadership. He has worked for several years as a developer with multiple languages in several organizations and industries with different methodologies. He has had hands-on experience with a broad range of technologies. Successful team lead for cross-functional agile teams with a strong focus on delivering the right thing in the right way. I've mentored and managed team members on different levels. Christoph is passionate about Agile and Scrum as software development methodology because it bridges the gap between development teams and business needs. He has a focus on security starting at development and going all the way through to the end user and our daily lives. Christoph is also strong with automated testing on every level.   Topics of Discussion: [2:20] What got Christoph into software testing and how did he get into automated testing? [6:53] What is the testing pyramid in software? [10:46] What are the best automated testing tools for .NET? [13:51] What is Mutation testing and Stryker Mutator? [22:46] How does TDD intersect with a bug report? [28:48] What is full-system testing and how does Playwright fit in? [29:49] What is the page object pattern for UI testing? [32:47] How to know when specialized testing might be needed for your application? [34:48] Why Christoph thinks accessibility testing should be important to everyone.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Testing pyramid Playwright Build quality checks Mutation testing — Stryker Mutator FluentAssertions   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

6 March 2023


Christian Clausen: When to Refactor - Episode 234

Christian Clausen: When to Refactor - Episode 234

Christian Clausen works as a Technical Agile Coach teaching teams how to properly refactor their code. Previously he worked as a software engineer on the Coccinelle semantic patching project, an automated refactoring tool. He has an MSc in computer science and five years of experience teaching software quality at a university level. He is the author of the book Five Lines of Code published by Manning. He was one of the Top Three rated speakers at GOTO Aarhus 2022. People were standing in line to get a signed copy of his book Five Lines of Code.   Topics of Discussion: [2:46] Christian talks about what got him into coding from a young age, and some of his favorite things about coding. He also discusses how the industry has changed since he first began his career. [6:19] Christian shares the reason behind the premise that every method should get down to no more than five lines of code. [9:07] What does “collaborate with the compiler” mean in Christian’s book? [13:38] The process behind changing code by addition, rather than modification. [22:16] Christian talks about defending the data. [26:49] Christian’s mental model of spaceship architecture. [30:04] What extra features does Christian’s book come with?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us at programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Five Lines of Code Christian on Twitter Christian on Medium   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

27 February 2023


Christian Wenz: ASP .NET Core Security - Episode 233

Christian Wenz: ASP .NET Core Security - Episode 233

Christian Wenz works as a consultant, trainer, and author with a focus on web technologies and is the author or co-author of over 100 computer books. He regularly contributes to various IT magazines and speaks at conferences around the globe. Christian holds a "Diplom" (the German equivalent of a master’s degree) in Computer Sciences, and one in Business Informatics. In his day job, he is one of the founders of the web agency Arrabiata Solutions (http://www.arrabiata.com/) with offices in Munich, Germany, and in London, UK. He also frequently works with development teams to make their applications better performing, more secure, and more reliable.   Topics of Discussion: [2:51] Has Christian really written over 100 computer books? Christian talks about the books and the high points of technology that he has worked in. [7:16] What is the OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project) Top 10 list? [10:33] You always have to be aware that something may go wrong, and have a security mindset. [12:05] Again and again, make sure that you understand the fundamentals of web app security, because eventually, you will make a mistake in your code. [12:30] What is insecure design? [13:43] Christian talks about the enumeration scheme CWE: common weakness enumeration, which basically assigns a number to each risk or attack. [17:00] How should people be logging into their web sessions now with .NET7? [18:31] The major mistake you can make these days is to write your own authentication mechanism. [23:57] What is Christian’s favorite mechanism today for securing HTTP web services? [31:05] What are some of the tools Christian always reaches for, and how do we differentiate between static auditing and dynamically auditing an application?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast! Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Christian Microsoft Profile ASP.NET Core Security Christian’s Books on Amazon OWASP Identity Server Dependabot Security Code Scan Configuring Code Scanning for a Repository   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

20 February 2023


Lars Klint: Microsoft Azure State of the Art - Episode 232

Lars Klint: Microsoft Azure State of the Art - Episode 232

Lars is a Senior Developer Advocate with Pluralsight, author, trainer, Microsoft Azure MVP, community leader, aspiring YouTube host, and part-time classic car collector. He is heavily involved in the space of cloud computing services, especially Azure, and is a published author, solution architect, and writer for numerous publications. He has been a part of the software development community for the past 20 years and co-organizes the DDD Melbourne community conference, organizes developer events with Microsoft, and also runs a part-time car restoration business. He has spoken at numerous technical events around the world and is an expert in Australian Outback Internet.   Topics of Discussion: [4:24] Lars talks about his early start in programming and the IT industry and his path to his present-day career. [6:36] As a self-described “nerd that doesn’t mind talking to people,” Lars worked that characteristic into networking over his career. [8:17] Why did Lars decide to write a book? [9:40] Lars talks about his book, Microsoft Azure in Action. [9:57] What part of Azure should developers be using more than less? [13:00] What ideas have risen to the surface for general internal business application developers? [16:36] What’s the best way to store and manipulate data? [21:58] What are some of Lars’s favorite scenarios where you would reach for the queue? [23:57] How would Lars decipher his architectural decisions on whether to use App Service? [26:57] What is Lars’s thought process when creating service workers to read from that queue versus creating a second app that is installed into the app service plan? [30:34] Lars talks about the importance of Application Insights.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Programming with Palermo — New Video Podcast!  Email us programming@palermo.network Clear Measure, Inc. (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Microsoft Azure in Action Lars On YouTube   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

13 February 2023


Colin Bowern: Deployments and Ops using Octopus Deploy - Episode 231

Colin Bowern: Deployments and Ops using Octopus Deploy - Episode 231

Colin is the SVP of Product at Octopus Deploy. As a technical product leader, his career has spanned music, health, financial, and technology industries with companies like Microsoft, Johnson Controls, Brink’s, Orion Health, and officialCOMMUNITY. He is passionate about growing product people through his work with the Product Aotearoa community. You can learn more about him at ColinBowern.com.   Topics of Discussion: [2:23] How Colin got involved in Octopus Deploy. [5:43] What is the value proposition for Octopus Deploy? [11:30] Who is Octopus Deploy built for? [12:52] How do we categorize all the after-deploy activities? [14:46] How do we get happy deployments? [18:36] What are some of the themes or categories that have emerged in Runbooks that are universally applicable? [21:51] What has happened in the DevOps space since 2010 when the term “DevOps Engineer” was first used? [24:01] Colin talks about infrastructure as code in the cloud. [30:01] Colin talks about his view on the future of Windows Server and Windows Server Operating System. [36:28] What is the easiest way for someone to get started in Octopus?   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo - New Video Podcast! programming@palermo.network Colin Bowern on Twitter Colin Bowern Website Colin Bowern LinkedIn Colin Bowern Microsoft Octopus Deploy 30 Point Inspection Octopus Deploy Jumpstart Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

6 February 2023


Philip Japikse: Professional C# in .NET  - Episode 230

Philip Japikse: Professional C# in .NET - Episode 230

An international speaker, Microsoft MVP, ASPInsider, MCSD, PSM II, PSD, and PST, and a passionate member of the developer community, Phil has been working with .NET since the first betas, developing software for over 35 years, and heavily involved in the agile community since 2005 as well as a Professional Scrum Trainer. Phil has taken over the best-selling Pro C# books (Apress Publishing), including "Pro C# 10", is the President of the Cincinnati .NET User’s Group (Cinnug.org), and the Cincinnati Software Architect Group, co-hosted the Hallway Conversations podcast (Hallwayconversations.com), founded and runs the CincyDeliver conference (Cincydeliver.org), and volunteers for the National Ski Patrol. During the day, Phil works as the CTO for Pintas & Mullins. Phil always enjoys learning new tech and is always striving to improve his craft.   Topics of Discussion: [2:22] What were the key points that steered Philip along his career and watershed moments? [6:42] The importance of having a contract in place for every job. [8:14] Philip talks about honing his craft and putting himself in rooms with people he admired. [11:01] What did the Library of Congress have to do with Philip’s book? [18:00] As the CTO of a private company, what does Philip think about the software executive role? [19:33] Don’t ask your employees to do anything they’re not willing to do for you. Trust your employees and let them grow. [24:11] The best leaders don’t have to be in management. [24:53] What is an NCO, non-commissioned officer? [27:15] Phil shares his view on object-oriented programming in the modern C#. [32:19] What is technical debt? [33:50] Another really nice feature built into Entity Framework core, or EF core, is the idea of concurrency checking. [37:57] When you refactor, you want the end product to be what you would have made it if you had been going from the beginning. [42:12] Philip talks about running the Cincy Deliver conference.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo - New Video Podcast! programming@palermo.network Phil on Twitter Phil’s Blog Phil’s Sessions Philip on Microsoft  Philip on Scrum Philip on GitHub Philip’s Books   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

30 January 2023


Stephanie Herr: Database DevOps with Stephanie Herr - Episode 229

Stephanie Herr: Database DevOps with Stephanie Herr - Episode 229

Stephanie Herr is a Product Manager for Database DevOps at Redgate Software. She’s been an instrumental part of every Database DevOps product at Redgate for the past 13 years and has spoken at industry conferences such as DevOps World.   Topics of Discussion: [3:58] Stephanie talks about taking ideas from her previous working experience into Redgate. [4:29] What makes the database so different from application development? [6:23] What patterns work the best and which ones haven’t really panned out? [9:08] The state-based approach vs. migration approach. [13:30] How do you categorize all the different things that may need to be deployed or changed? [14:09] What is static data? [15:44] What is the latest in the Redgate products that everyone should know about? [21:41] Stephanie talks about the change report and the process behind caching best practices. [23:10] What is Sequel Fluff? [26:28] Stephanie talks about the integration with Sequel Monitor. [27:46] Are the Azure services completely covered? [30:35] Where does Stephanie see Database DevOps going? [32:33] Stephanie shares an exciting new announcement!   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo - New Video Podcast! programming@palermo.network Stephanie Herr LinkedIn Stephanie Herr | Redgate Redgate Flyway Postgres support in December Sqlfluff.com Redgate Software   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

23 January 2023


Brian Lagunas: Modern Web - Episode 228

Brian Lagunas: Modern Web - Episode 228

Brian Lagunas is a Microsoft MVP, a Microsoft Patterns & Practices Champion, leader of the Boise .Net Developers User Group (NETDUG), board member of Boise Code Camp, speaker, trainer, and Pluralsight author. He can be found speaking at a variety of developer events around the world. His talks always involve some form of markup (XAML or HTML), as well as how to build well-architected applications with Prism. In his spare time, he authors courses for Pluralsight, blogs, livestreams about various technologies, and manages the Prism Library. The easiest way to find Brian is on Twitter at @BrianLagunas.   Topics of Discussion: [2:43] What triggered Brian to go from the Army into programming? [5:49] Brian started in Java because that’s how new .NET was. [8:22] What is Reveal, and how many code bases do you have to reach all those places? [12:37] What is Brian’s thought about using Blazer vs. JavaScript vs. Typescript? [15:20] How do we bridge the gap between using NPM and Blazer Applications?  [17:31] How does Brian think about the different levels of unit tests of these different types of code, and then what classifications do you create in your test libraries? [21:47] What is App Builder? [24:39] What’s the track record of App Builder? Is it already mainstream? [30:20] What Brian’s team is focused on now is getting that initial application built, generated, out the door, and ready for the developer to implement the logic.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo - New Video Podcast! programming@palermo.network Brian Lagunas Brian Lagunas Microsoft Profile GitHub Brian Lagunas Brian Lagunas LinkedIn Brian Lagunas Twitter Plural Sight Brian Lagunas Brian Lagunas YouTube   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

16 January 2023


Marco Rossignoli: Automated Code Coverage Measurement - Episode 227

Marco Rossignoli: Automated Code Coverage Measurement - Episode 227

Marco Rossignoli is a Dev at Microsoft on the .NET Test Platform and Code coverage team. He's also the co-maintainer of the Coverlet Collector NuGet package, which has over 100M downloads.   Topics of Discussion: [1:15] Jeffrey talks about the architect forums he’s hosting and facilitating in 2023. You can register here. [2:53] Marco talks about how he got into code coverage. [6:44] Why is code coverage even useful to measure? [12:40] How does Coverlet work and how is it different from the old ones? How do you run it? [20:30] Is there any difference in how it works between Azure Pipelines or GitHub Actions or TeamCity? [21:40] With multiple test suites running, how does Coverlet support pulling all the results together so that you get the one number of code coverage? [23:40] Report generator merges all of the reports. [25:16] What exactly is Cobertura? [26:02] Marco shares why he is excited about Coverlet and the many opportunities it gives us in the future.   Mentioned in this Episode: Clear Measure Way Architect Forum Software Engineer Forum Architect Tips — Video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo - New Video Podcast! programming@palermo.network NuGet Gallery GitHub Coverlet Coverage Marco Rossignoli .Net Coverage Code   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

9 January 2023


A 2023 Happy New Year and 2022 Review - Episode 226

A 2023 Happy New Year and 2022 Review - Episode 226

Happy New Year to all here in 2023. It’s going to be a great year. It’s a great time to be a programmer. A great time to be building with .NET; you are going to do great things this year. You have what it takes. You are smart, you have great tools, and you have a great team. You are a great leader. This episode is going to be all about remembering what happened this past year at the podcast.   Topics of Discussion:  [1:15] Jeffrey talks about the architect forums he’s hosting and facilitating in 2023. You can register here. [1:46] Huge announcement in Microsoft Developer news including: - Android apps on Windows 11 - ARM processors getting big investments - Microsoft Dev Box — in preview — dev workstation in the cloud - Power Pages websites - Large SKU app service; up to 256GB RAM available for those who need it - Azure Arc, the new name of Hybrid Azure. And a single-node Azure Stack for remote locations but the programming model of Azure — looking forward to testing it at the right time. - Azure Container Apps tooling got better, and it became ready for prime time. Every team should be looking at this. - .NET 7 released. [4:11] What might the default application stacks and environments look like on the platform in 2023? - Windows 11 - Visual Studio 2022 w/ ReSharper - .NET 7 - Onion Architecture - Blazor for interactive applications - .NET service workers for back-end jobs and queue listeners - Entity Framework with Azure SQL — add on other storage services as per application. - Azure App Service for hosting while prototyping Azure Container Apps. - Application Insights with the Open Telemetry NuGet packages. - Azure Pipelines paired with Octopus Deploy (keep an eye on GitHub Actions as they fill out support for scenarios you need). - NordVPN for developer workstation work-from-home or remote Wi-Fi. [9:11] When it comes to developer workstations, desktop computers are still giving the most bang for the buck with power, and only a few laptops do the job really well. I have not reviewed all computers, and there are a lot out there. I can vouch for Alienware R series desktops. Liquid-cooled, so they are really quiet, even under full load. Dell Precision laptops are amazing for software engineers. I really wanted to love the Lenovo P1, but the fan was just too loud when it was under load. And we all know that cooling is so important in laptops. When a laptop gets too hot, your BIOS will slow down the processor to keep it from burning up. Then you no longer have a fast processor. And video calls use a good deal of processor, surprisingly — or not. For super mobile laptops that you can use for programming, I really do like the Microsoft Surface Laptop. I wanted to like the Surface Studio laptop, but they inverted the cooling and the battery placement, so it’s very uncomfortable on my lap and my wrists unfortunately under load. The wrist wrest gets really hot. Normally the battery is under the wrist rest, but Microsoft swapped it on this one, so it’s not fun using it as a laptop on your lap or even on a desk while hot and under load. [13:11] Highlighting some past episodes that will be interesting:  - Highlighting some past episodes over the year that might be interesting. - With Microsoft Orleans providing a new implementation of the Actor design pattern, we have a two-part series interview with Aaron Stannard, the creator of Akka.NET, episodes 172 and 173. - On the IoT front, Wilderness Labs has been trucking along creating system-on-a-chip options that run .NET natively and easily. I interviewed founder and CEO Bryan Costanich. - For those educating themselves for a career in software engineering, my interview with Henry Quillin might be useful. He talks about a programming internship and his education journey, his work earning his Eagle Scout, and how he became a working programmer even as he is just starting university. - More on embedded. Kevin Kirkus was with us in episode 186. He runs a testing team at Intel doing automated testing for their Xeon processor line. The design necessary for testing in this specialized environment gives us all plenty to think about. - For team leaders out there, I interviewed Mark Seemann. He wrote a recent book, Code That Fits In Your Head. He talks about the principles that are in the book. I subsequently bought and read the book, and I wish I had this book earlier in my career. Would have saved me a great deal of time. - On distributed systems, Udi Dahan is always a fascinating gentleman to listen to. Check out episode 192. As the founder and CEO of Particular Software, and the creator of NServiceBus, he is one of the world’s leading experts on distributed systems, microservices, and messaging architectures. - Time-tested ideas are continually useful. I had the pleasure of interviewing Philippe Kruchten. He worked at Rational Software back when they were at the forefront of the software process in the 1990s. He published a paper outlining a framework for emergent, agile architecture. He didn’t call it that. He called it the 4+1 Architecture, but only because it predated the agile manifesto. If you are an architect, and you aren’t aware of this approach to architecture, give episode 195 a listen. - For the Blazor developers, I had Steve Sanderson on in episode 202. Steve is the original designer of Blazor, which has become the new default web application on .NET. He shared about the future of Blazor and WebAssembly. - Because there is so much going on in this space, Daniel Roth also joined me to discuss more Blazor Futures. - GitHub Actions is being talked about quite a bit. While loads of people are using it for builds, people are scratching their heads about where it fits in regarding deployments. Damian Brady, on the GitHub team and a former employee of Octopus Deploy, sheds light on this in episode 206. - Scott Hunter joined me in episode 211. He announced his new role at Microsoft running more of Azure development and .NET. He shared quite a bit behind the scenes regarding Microsoft’s strategy there. - For the UX people. Mark Miller is the Chief Architect of DevExpress, the big UI components company. He has a brilliant user experience mind, and I was able to get him talking in episode 212. - Telemetry. We all need it to keep our software stable in production. The Serilog and AutoFac maintainer, Nicholas Blumhardt, joined me to discuss the fundamentals of modern logging and telemetry. Check out episode 217 for that. - More on the testing front, Eduardo Maltez, a software engineer doing some really interesting full system test work shares his thoughts on what makes tests reliable, stable, and fast — and how to fight brittle tests. Episode 224. - We closed out the year on the security front. With LastPass getting hacked and now Rackspace having a hacking-induced major outage, we all need to take action. Troy Vinson, a multi-certified security professional and certified ethical hacker, gave his perspective on the Rackspace breach and what every .NET team should learn from it.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

2 January 2023


Troy Vinson: Learning From the Rackspace Security Breach with Troy Vinson - Episode 225

Troy Vinson: Learning From the Rackspace Security Breach with Troy Vinson - Episode 225

Troy Vinson is a Principal Software Architect at Clear Measure as a CISSP (Certified Information System Security Professional). He is an experienced leader, architect, and problem-solver in Information Systems Security and Software Development technologies and has spent the majority of his career integrating computer science, information science, and cognitive science to assist in software development and the management of information.   Topics of Discussion: [2:39] Is Troy a Certified Ethical Hacker? If so, what does that mean, and what does he see in the divide of focus between security and programming? [5:08] What do we know about the Rackspace security breach? [7:37] How many hosted exchange customers does Rackspace have? [11:01] Having a contingency plan in place and a recovery plan is very important. [14:07] What’s the most basic way that someone could start doing this for themselves? [21:08] Non-malicious use is also a protection against malicious use. [26:09] What is email protection, and how do you use it?  [28:24] What should development teams be thinking about, security-wise, for their custom applications? [32:54] The importance of having a software bill of materials so that you have a policy about which software can be used.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network Rackspace Ep 161 with Troy Vinson Rackspace Status KnowBe4 Sonar Source Microsoft Security Engineering   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

26 December 2022


Eduardo Maltez: Full-system testing using Selenium - Episode 224

Eduardo Maltez: Full-system testing using Selenium - Episode 224

Eduardo Maltez is a Software Engineer at Clear Measure. He has extensive experience in .NET, including Blazor, SignalR, Azure Service Bus, SQL Server, and all kinds of automated testing. Earlier in his career, he apprenticed under Jeffrey Palermo and is currently building automated full-system tests for a large and complex software ecosystem at one of his clients.   Topics of Discussion: [3:09] How Eduardo got into programming and the steps he took to make it a full-time career. [8:04] How Eduardo makes the decision in his head when he needs to use Selenium vs. other tests. [10:52] Eduardo talks about ShoWorks and the technology components behind it. [16:27] What does it mean when a test is brittle, and what do you do to make tests that are not brittle? [18:41] When a test is brittle, it means you can’t really rely on that test. Brittle tests are unreliable tests, in the end. [23:36] How do you know when to stop a unit test? [25:44] What are Educardo’s go-to methods for finding the right DOM element? [33:26] When it comes to rough edges around Selenium itself, it’s not necessarily something that doesn’t work, but it’s something that definitely always causes just a sudden road bump in the test cycle.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network ShoWorks Selenium WebDriver Wait Class   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

19 December 2022


David Pine: NET Content Development - Episode 223

David Pine: NET Content Development - Episode 223

David Pine works in Developer Relations at Microsoft, focusing on .NET and Azure developer content. He is recognized as a Google Developer Expert in Web Technologies and is a Twilio Champion. David focuses on the developer community, actively seeking opportunities to share knowledge through speaking engagements around the world. David advocates for open-source, the .NET Foundation, C#, TypeScript, SignalR, Reactive Extensions, Azure, and .NET. He's a founding member and co-host of the On .NET Live show. Follow David on Twitter at @davidpine7.   Topics of Discussion: [2:41] What were the high points along David’s career that steered him in the direction of Microsoft, and how has that evolved? [4:46] Jeffrey’s background in music and how he got into it. [8:20] Does David believe that the age of the JavaScript SPA front end for .NET developers is over? [10:32] David discusses his role as a technical writer, with more on the content developer side. [11:36] David’s show On .NET Live celebrates .NET developers from all over the world. [12:40] Microsoft has been doing a lot of work recently with GitHub actions. How do we monitor their different versions and use them to the best of our abilities? [21:17] What level of maturity is Microsoft’s Orleans, and why does David like using it? [27:10] What are some new samples coming out? [30:05] What exactly is “globbing”?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network David Pine .NET Fundamentals @DavidPine Twitter GitHub Actions. NET SDK: Hello from the GitHub Actions: Core .NET SDK On .NET Live — YouTube  GitHub .NET Samples .NET GitHub Actions Github.com/dotnet/orleans Learn.microsoft.com/dotnet/orleans/  Learn.microsoft.com/dotnet/fundamentals/ Learn.microsoft.com/dotnet/devops/github-actions-overview Learning Blazor (davidpine.net) Davidpine.net/blog/learning-blazor/   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

12 December 2022


Jeff Fritz: Evolving Cloud Architecture - Episode 222

Jeff Fritz: Evolving Cloud Architecture - Episode 222

Jeff Fritz is an experienced developer, technical educator, and PM on the .NET team at Microsoft. He founded The Live Coders team on Twitch, and regularly livestreams builds of websites and fun applications. You can follow Jeff for more .NET, .NET Core, and Visual Studio content on Twitch and Twitter at @csharpfritz.   Topics of Discussion: [2:41] Jeff talks about surviving the .com bomb and his background as a longtime web developer and technical educator. [3:57] What have been some of the recent developments that Jeff and his team are most excited about at Microsoft? [5:45] Jeff talks about how the application has been growing and how he’s had some bumps in the road. [7:40] How to make video clips searchable and discoverable on the web. [12:12] What made Jeff go for MySQL instead of serverless Azure SQL? [18:01] What’s the duration of the journey from the first line of code to enterprise patterns? [21:09] As we grow applications, we need to figure out a better way to show people what happens when you make a mistake, and to help them through the growth. [27:13] How do you know what’s going to happen at a certain level of production? [22:48] Does Jeff really believe we’re going to end up at Kubernetes? [32:27] Re-architecting your database architecture.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network Jeff on Twitch KlipTok Fritz's Tech Tips and Chatter   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

5 December 2022


Brady Gaster: Orleans - Episode 221

Brady Gaster: Orleans - Episode 221

Brady is a Principal Program Manager on the Azure Developer Experience team at Microsoft where he works on Orleans, SignalR, microservices, APIs, and integration with Azure service teams in hopes to make it exciting for developers who work on .NET apps to party in the cloud!   Topics of Discussion: [4:17] Moving around a lot gave Brady a lot of insight into all the different ways that we can benefit developers and all the different opportunities we have to make things better. [6:30] The people in Docs hack all the time. [7:01] What is Orleans? [11:40] What’s the best database to use for distributed applications? [21:10] Open telemetry gives us the capability of being able to trace messages that go from one end of your system all the way to the other end of your system through multiple silos and multiple clients. [22:08] The three pillars of observability: logging, distributed tracing (which is really where open telemetry shines), and then metrics. [26:02] How does the traceability side of open telemetry apply to Azure? [28:02] What else should we know about Orleans?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network “Brady Gaster on SignalR and More” Brady Gaster Brady Gaster GitHub Brady Gaster Rock Paper Orleans Brady Gaster Website   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

28 November 2022


Matthew Renze: Developing Your AI Strategy - Episode 220

Matthew Renze: Developing Your AI Strategy - Episode 220

Matthew Renze is a data science consultant, author, and public speaker. He is the founder of Renze Consulting, an AI consulting company that has trained over 400,000 software developers and IT professionals. His clients range from small tech start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. He is also the President of Serenze Global, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to improving access to technology education for under-represented individuals by empowering the next generation of tech community leaders. Matthew is currently working on his Master’s degree in Artificial Intelligence with a Data Science specialization at Johns Hopkins University. He currently has double degrees in Computer Science and Philosophy with a minor in Economics from Iowa State University. He is a Microsoft MVP in AI, an ASPInsider, and an author for Pluralsight, Udemy, and Skillshare. His interests include AI, ML, data science, mindfulness, technology education, and tech community leadership.   Topics of Discussion: [3:37] How Matthew got into software development and rebranded himself as a data science consultant before going independent as a consultant. Now, he is in the process of rebranding as an AI consultant, rather than a data science consultant, still with a foundation in data science. [4:41] What exactly is AI? [6:23] Matthew discusses what a traveling salesman is. [9:15] Matthew sorts out the difference between AI and ML for us. [10:35] Artificial intelligence typically includes a bunch of other tools, in addition to machine learning. [11:11] We now have more enhanced versions of machine learning that fall under the umbrella of AI, like deep learning, and reinforcement learning, which are all built on top of the idea of machine learning. [12:12] What are the levels of education that should exist within an organization? [14:49] What can be automated now that used to not be able to be automated? [19:03] How GitHub co-pilot can help. [20:14] What is an AI Factory, and why are people arguing over it? [21:32] If we can eliminate our busy work, we can essentially get models built quicker, get data science done quicker, and get things automated quicker. [22:20] The DevOps platform. [27:40] One of the biggest questions that remain with AI is if we end up with more jobs created as a result of artificial intelligence than are eliminated by it. [31:32] Okay, let’s say how to pronounce data correctly.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network “Matthew Renze on Data Science for Developers” Matthew Renze Competing in the Age of AI: Strategy and Leadership When Algorithms and Networks Run the World, by Marco Iansiti Karim R. Lakhani   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

21 November 2022


Donovan Brown: Microservices DevOps - Episode 219

Donovan Brown: Microservices DevOps - Episode 219

Donovan Brown is a Partner Program Manager in the Azure CTO Incubations team at Microsoft. The Incubations team focuses on forward-looking development and innovation to facilitate the development of new projects and ideas. Before joining Microsoft, Donovan spent seven years as a Process Consultant and a Certified Scrum Master. Donovan has traveled the globe helping companies develop solutions using agile practices in many industries. Donovan is an avid programmer, often finding ways to integrate software into his other hobbies and activities.   Topics of Discussion: [3:02] Donovan talks about the high points of his career and what led him to work in the Azure CTO incubations team at Microsoft. [7:14] What are the differences in a DevOps environment for microservices from an interior application? [9:49] There can be pure and perfect pipelines for microservices, but there's a whole bunch of gray there. [12:25] Microservices are as small as they can be but no smaller. [14:22] Donovan shares that what he is thinking about is which of these do I need to scale independently of everything else, and how can he then write it in such a way that it works. [18:44] Donovan shares why he calls himself “test aware.” [25:57] How do you decide if a microservice needs to scale separately from the rest of the application? [31:02] When Donovan thinks of Web3, the first thing that pops into his mind is blockchains. [32:18] To Donovan, the technology is about the blockchain that underlies it, the ability to write smart contracts that live on that blockchain, and being able to democratize a lot of things that today are centralized through the people who do our authentication for us and who own our data. [34:53] What’s the current state of DevOps, and where are we on the Web3 curve? Donovan talks about the need to educate yourself about it, and to make sure you listen to a diversity of opinions. [41:35] NFTs can actually be used for really clever use cases that a lot of people just haven't seen yet.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network How to Use Azure DevOps Services with Donovan Brown DevOps for Web3 series Donovan Brown at MS Ignite 2022   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

14 November 2022


Dave McKinstry: The Evolution of DevOps - Episode 218

Dave McKinstry: The Evolution of DevOps - Episode 218

Dave McKinstry. Dave is a Director at GitHub helping to drive the FastTrack program. Prior to GitHub, he worked as a Program Manager with the Azure DevOps Services Community Team — connecting with partners and customers, spreading modern practices, and helping developers succeed with DevOps and Azure. Prior to his position at Microsoft, he has been in software services and technical sales for over 30 years. As a consultant, principal consultant, co-owner, and manager, he has always helped people efficiently build better software. He loves what he does as a technologist and enjoys being a part of today's rapid technology evolution.   Topics of Discussion: [3:05] Dave talks about getting into consulting, and then finding his way to Azure DevOps before joining Microsoft, and ultimately GitHub. [4:27] What is the difference between Microsoft and GitHub? How do they do things differently? [7:57] The evolution of DevOps and how it has evolved over time from the start to now. [9:53] Why DevSecOps is redundant. Security has to be part of everything we do. So security is every engineer and every product owner. For anyone working in your company, security is part of their job. [11:00] Dave discusses Inner Source. [15:05] Having cultural trust is extremely important. Can you trust the people that you have working for you to do the best work they can for your organization? If the answer is no, there are probably other problems, other things to worry about. [16:08] You can see the code of anything external that’s been shared, but there are a lot of organizations with multiple software teams who just don’t automatically give their own employees even read access to the repositories of the other team. [21:50] Microsoft has kind of done some things to strengthen GitHub, like hosted build agents and others, and then GitHub does things that strengthen Microsoft.  [30:05] Where does Dave think the industry is headed in the future?  [31:51] Regardless of how big the company is, developers should be better empowered.  [32:03] Plug for GitHub Universe.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network Dave McKinstry on Integrating Azure DevOps and the Culture of DevOps - Episode 005 GitHub GitHub Universe   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

7 November 2022


Nicholas Blumhardt: Structured Logging - Episode 217

Nicholas Blumhardt: Structured Logging - Episode 217

Nicholas Blumhardt is the Founder/CEO at @datalust_seq, core maintainer for #Serilog, founder of @AutofacIoC, and long-ago .NET PM at Microsoft. He resides in Brisbane, Australia.   Topics of Discussion: [2:25] Nicholas talks about what got him into structured logging. [7:09] As a consultant, what surprised Nicholas about structured logging? [7:57] Rather than just being able to easily pass the logs that he was already writing, Nicholas could think about building something that was more like a developer interface for the app. [10:07] A lot of people associate the tooling and technology with DevOps, but if you dig back into why we originally set out on that path, it was much more about the practices. [11:10] Building your systems so that they are easier to run and diagnose issues is really where it’s at. [12:25] Structured logging is just one tool in the tool belt to achieve observability. [13:54] What other tools does Nicholas use to gain observability? [17:09] What is Serilog and how does it serve as an interface for structured logging? [29:51] Why is Seq useful and why should listeners give it a try?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network Nicholas Blumhardt Twitter Autofac Website Autofac Serilog Seq Nicholas Blumhardt Website nblumhardt@nblumhardt.com

31 October 2022


Isaac Abraham: Farmer for Azure Deployments - Episode 216

Isaac Abraham: Farmer for Azure Deployments - Episode 216

Isaac Abraham is an. NET MVP and a .NET developer since .NET 1.0 with an interest in cloud computing and distributed data problems. He is the author of Get Programming with F# and is the director of Compositional IT. He specializes in consultancy, training, and development, helping customers adopt high-quality, functional-first solutions on the .NET platform.   Topics of Discussion: [3:12] Isaac talks about getting into Software Dev, how he sought to work in a small space where he could learn hands-on about .NET development, and how he has been doing that ever since. [4:22] How has the landscape changed? [5:00] Isaac got into Azure during the early days. [6:59] How is consulting different? [13:20] What exactly is Farmer, and how do we use it? [16:44] Does it matter which .NET language the nougat package is pulled into? [18:29] An F# project can exist nicely in a Visual Studio solution with other C# projects. [19:59] With Isaac’s unabashed opinion on Farmer, does he prefer having one project that has all of the infrastructure code for both with all the components that are deployed in the application, or does he prefer referencing pharma from the different applications and distributing that logic? [29:48] Isaac does use Azure Client, but ironically, it’s only to deploy the templates that Farmer generates.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network The Cockney Coder Isaac Abraham FarmerCompositional IT isaac@compositional-it.com Isaac’s Twitter Get Programming with F#: A guide for .NET developers   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

24 October 2022


Ted Neward: Getting the Most Out of In-Person Conferences - Episode 215

Ted Neward: Getting the Most Out of In-Person Conferences - Episode 215

Ted is a self-described geek who takes great pride and joy in making other geeks into bigger and better (and hopefully more highly rewarded) geeks. Having recently stepped into a management role, Ted has been looking for more and more ways to leverage his skills as a “force multiplier” across his entire team to not only better the team itself — but the entire organization as a whole.   Topics of Discussion: [5:04] Microsoft is probably going to look for ways to do the summit in person, but the pandemic has shown us we can also use remote options for those that don’t want to or can’t travel. [6:14] Ted discusses some tools that make getting the information at conferences easier and more accessible. [13:15] We all want to find that tribe; to find that group of people where we feel like we fit in. [23:10] Ted talks about why he doesn’t love that a lot of conferences are kind of trying to combine professional development and family vacation. [25:10] Remember that you are at a professional event, and you represent your company. Don’t lose sight of why you are there. [28:20] What Ted has been playing with these days. [34:56] The problem with low-code solutions is that they’re designed for hobbyists. [40:26] The emergence of low-code and no-code tools.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network Episode 135 http://www.lolcode.org/ — lolcode: transpiler, compiler https://github.com/justinmeza/lci https://ballerina.io/ http://www.cs.uni.edu/~okane/source/MUMPS-MDH/MumpsTutorial.pdf   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

17 October 2022


Alvin Ashcraft: Windows SDKs - Episode 214

Alvin Ashcraft: Windows SDKs - Episode 214

Alvin Ashcraft has over 27 years of programming experience in the healthcare, financial, and manufacturing industries. He is a Content Developer for Microsoft, creating docs for Windows developers on Microsoft Docs. He has authored a book for Packt Publishing titled Learn WinUI 3, and has just published his second book, Parallel Programming and Concurrency with C# 10 and .NET 6, out now.   Alvin is one of the founders and organizers of the TechBash developer conference held annually at the Kalahari Resort in Pocono Manor, PA. In his previous life, he worked for consulting firms as a software developer. During those years Alvin developed solutions for clients in the manufacturing, financial, and healthcare industries. Alvin is a blogger, technology geek, family guy, and former Microsoft MVP. He has a wonderful wife and three amazing daughters.   Topics of Discussion: [3:18] How Alvin got started with his blog, and how blogging made RSS a thing. [5:48] What exactly does NewsBlur do for you? [10:10] Are we overstating it when we say that people who work in development need to become expert users of all the frameworks and tools they intend to use? [12:20] Alvin talks about the inspiration behind his new book, and why he chose parallel programming and concurrency as the topics. [16:35] Okay, what is it really like having TechBash at the beautiful Kalahari resort? [22:00] What does the future hold for Windows development? [24:03] How else can we best be prepared for the future?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.network Alvin’s main blog Alvin’s WinUI blog Twitter TechBash Twitter TechBash site Alvin’s GitHub OpenLiveWriter plugin The Documentation landing page on MS Learn: Learn.microsoft.com/docs/ The landing page for Windows developer docs: Learn.microsoft.com/windows/apps/ A list of sample apps and samples repos for Windows developers Learn WinUI 3 book: Parallel Programming  and Concurrency with C# 10 and .NET 6 book Newsblur.com/ Feedly.com/ Openlivewriter.com/ Github.com/MicrosoftDocs/win32 Github.com/MicrosoftDocs/windows-dev-docs Github.com/MicrosoftDocs/sdk-api TPL Data Flow library   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

10 October 2022


Rob Richardson: Web Services in .NET 6 - Episode 213

Rob Richardson: Web Services in .NET 6 - Episode 213

Rob Richardson is a software craftsman who is building web properties in ASP.NET, Node, React, and Vue. He’s a software developer, a community leader, a mentor, and the business owner of Richardson & Sons. Additionally, Rob is a Microsoft MVP; a published author; a frequent speaker at conferences, user groups, and community events; and a diligent teacher and student of high-quality software development.   Topics of Discussion: [3:25] Rob starts us off with a cool trick to remember how many days of the month there are. [5:25] Rob talks about why he invested in getting really good at unit testing and integration testing. [5:50] What is the big “wow” factor that developers should not miss with .NET6? [8:35] With minimal APIs, is it different capabilities, or have they mapped all of the capabilities of web API down into those extension methods that you can use? [10:25] What is the difference between authorization and authentication? [17:25] What’s Rob’s preferred mechanism for internal private web services? [21:30] Where Raspberry APIs really shine. [22:08] Rob tells us about a very cool talk he has coming up. [27:03] DevContainers is such a magical thing. [28:02] Rob is digging deep into GitHub actions, and he is starting to build out custom GitHub action tasks for interesting things.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net Episode 131 jwt.io   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

3 October 2022


Mark Miller: The Science of Great UI in Software - Episode 212

Mark Miller: The Science of Great UI in Software - Episode 212

Today’s guest is Mark Miller, a seven-year C# MVP with strong expertise in decoupled design, plug-in architectures, and great user interfaces. He is the Chief Architect of the IDE Tools division at Developer Express, as well as the visionary force behind productivity tools like CodeRush. Mark is a top-ranked speaker at conferences around the world and has been creating tools for software for almost four decades. On top of all that, Mark also streams live C# and typescript coding and design on Twitch.TV/CodeRushed!   Topics of Discussion: [2:45] Mark lives in Spain without speaking Spanish. [4:09] Over the recent months, they have made DevExpress free for everyone. [9:49] How did CodeRush start? [11:37] Products like CodeRush typically are leaders in innovating new features that are often incorporated into the IDE. [12:09] Intellicode is a brilliant innovation. [17:08] Mindset tips on using features to make your product better, and to make the important function available where the user is. [21:49] Mark shares the key to winning long-term in the IDE world — discoverability. [26:03] You want it to be easy for your customers to discover how to use the app, and what features are in the app.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net “Mark Miller on Developer Productivity — Episode 37” WCAG Standards and Guidelines CODERUSH “The Science of Great UI”   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

26 September 2022


Scott Hunter: Microsoft’s Azure & .NET Strategy- Episode 211

Scott Hunter: Microsoft’s Azure & .NET Strategy- Episode 211

Topics of Discussion: [2:27] What are some things happening and that have happened at Microsoft that we may not be aware of? [7:25] Scott talks about some of the upcoming developments he is excited about that will make using the cloud in the future even better. [9:00] Scott’s favorite part of that whole journey was that reboot, learning from the shifts and the ebbs of the industry and, asking how to make .NET the right product for that next wave. [12:20] Scott also talks more about Microsoft's strategy with Azure & .NET. [27:41] Scott gives a preview of the Azure Dev CLI. [30:52] What is the difference in strategies between Azure and .NET, and how do we bring those together? [36:59] What are the big things that we need to put on our calendar for this fall?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net Scott Hunter on .NET6   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

19 September 2022


Rocky Lhotka: CSLA - Episode 210

Rocky Lhotka: CSLA - Episode 210

Rockford Lhotka is the creator of the widely used CSLA .NET open-source development framework. He is the author of numerous books and regularly speaks at major conferences around the world. Rockford is a Microsoft Regional Director and MVP. He is co-chair of Visual Studio Live!, and the chair of the Cloud & Containers Live! Conferences. Rockford has worked on many projects in various roles, including software architecture, design and development, network administration, and project management. Over his career, he has designed and helped to create systems for bio-medical manufacturing, agriculture, point of sale, credit card fraud tracking, general retail, construction, and healthcare.   Topics of Discussion: [4:00] How an arcade game led Rocky to his career in software architecture, design, and development. [5:05] What is CSLA, and what problems does it solve? [8:40] Rocky defines business logic and what is not considered business logic. [17:11] Rocky discusses his object-oriented approach, and inspiration from computer science Professor David West. [19:25] A function library is where each rule is a function or a procedure. [20:58] Rocky thinks that using object-oriented concepts is the way to go. [23:51] Rocky’s preferred naming convention is to use a verb in the name. [28:20] CSLA tries as much as possible to give you this home for business logic and then also provides some buffer between your business logic and everything from Windows Forms all the way up through Blazer. [30:00] How does CSLA like to be used? [31:00] The CSLA framework is geared around an architecture where you have, at the center, this business logic layer, and below that you have a data access layer, and above that, you have an interface control layer.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net Rocky’s Blog Rocky on Episode 33 Marimer LLC David West — Object Thinking Marimer LLC Project Tracker   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

12 September 2022


Steve Smith: Domain-Driven Design and Architecture - Episode 209

Steve Smith: Domain-Driven Design and Architecture - Episode 209

Steve works with companies that want to avoid the trap of technical debt by helping their teams deliver quality software quickly. Steve and his team at NimblePros have been described by clients as a “force multiplier,” amplifying the value of existing development teams. Steve’s client list includes Microsoft, Quicken Loans, Celina Insurance, and many other satisfied customers. And he also offers career coaching to developers through Dev better.com.   Topics of Discussion: [3:20] What is onion architecture? [4:07] Steve discusses Domain-Driven design. [5:15] Domain-Driven Design is all about how to take big complicated problems in software, and break them up into smaller pieces that we as developers can isolate, think about, design, test, and then construct together in a modular fashion with other pieces. [6:00] The key concepts of Domain-Driven Design. [9:13] How and why DDD came about. [12:28] Why Steve thinks about it in terms of having a bounded context per application that you deploy. [16:33] Historical records of things should always be duplicate data. There should be a snapshot of the data at that time. [17:06] Where should people begin if/when they are new to the book? [17:54] What exactly is clean architecture? [23:01] Steven talks about having one infrastructure project where there are all these dependencies versus multiple. [24:09] Steve names the three main projects. [30:49] Very mature and high-stakes professions have chosen to put constraints on themselves, and with positive effect. How can we take this into architecture and design?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net devBetter NimblePros Ardalis Domain-Driven Design   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

5 September 2022


Mathias Brandewinder: Math and Machine Learning using .NET - Episode 208

Mathias Brandewinder: Math and Machine Learning using .NET - Episode 208

Mathias Brandewinder enjoys solving challenging business problems with software engineering and applied mathematics techniques, and some creativity. His current focus is on functional programming with F#, machine learning, and data science, and on putting them together to help companies make smarter decisions with their data. He loves teaching and mentoring, and is a regular speaker at conferences and community events all over the world. A former Microsoft F# MVP, he holds an MS in Operations Research from Stanford, an MS in Economics from University of Paris X, and an MBA from ESSEC.   Topics of Discussion: [3:15] Mathias talks about how his love of math got him into programming. [5:57] Mathias discusses what intrigued him about F# and the scripting environment. [6:29] What about when a computer’s version of a number doesn’t really line up with the math version of a number? [11:51] What issues does F# help more than C#? [15:22] What is Mathias’s favorite charting component for .NET? [18:27] What inspired Mathias to write his book, Machine Learning Projects for .NET Developers, and is there a new book on the horizon? [20:09] Mathias is here to say math can be genuinely fun! [24:03] Jupiter appears to be an on-the-fly evaluator of code that runs on a server somewhere through the browser. [29:13] What other math-related libraries should we be aware of, and what are some other resources we can check out?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net Mathias Brandewinder Website Mathias Brandewinder Bio mathias@brandewinder.com Five obscure charting tips with Plotly.NET Machine Learning Projects for .NET Developers DiffSharp Math.Net Numerics F# Get Started with OR-Tools for C#   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

29 August 2022


Jeffrey Palermo: The Process of Architecture - Episode 207

Jeffrey Palermo: The Process of Architecture - Episode 207

This is a special episode. I wanted to interrupt our fabulous stream of expert guests to talk about a topic that I think needs to be talked about, and that is architecture. What is it? What should we think about it, and how do we approach the process of architecture? To derive the verb, how do we go about determining and implementing a fitting architecture? To architect. If you are in this role, what is it that you do? What thought progression do you use? I’ll share some thoughts on that from 25-plus years of programming, and then I have a very special announcement at the end, so be sure to check that out.   Topics of Discussion: [2:19] Architecture is the intersection of the process that we use for software and the structure we want the software to be. Right there in that intersection is where leadership is required. [4:22] What are the building blocks of architecture, and what is the progression from the smallest building block up to the most complex and large software system? [9:24] If you’re creating a very, very small piece of software, you don’t need much architecture. [11:08] Jeffrey breaks down the term “monolithic” and how it relates to code. [11:15] If monolithic is bad, isn’t “polylithic” bad too? [15:18] What makes an application an application, and not just a library? An application is greater than a library because it has abstractions, and then it has configurations. [28:12] Special announcement: new video show is launched! Check out Programming with Palmero.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Programming with Palermo programming@palermo.net   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

22 August 2022


Damian Brady: GitHub Actions - Episode 206

Damian Brady: GitHub Actions - Episode 206

Damian Brady is a Developer Advocate at GitHub. He's a developer, speaker, and author specializing in DevOps, MLOps, developer process, and software architecture. Formerly a Cloud Advocate at Microsoft for four years, and before that, a dev at Octopus Deploy and a Microsoft MVP, he has a 20-plus year background in software development and consulting in a broad range of industries. In Australia, he co-organized the Brisbane .Net User Group and launched the annual DDD Brisbane conference.   Topics of Discussion: [2:45] How does Damian describe the landscape between Microsoft and GitHub? [4:12] What is it about automated development that jazzes Damian up? [5:57] Damian describes the lay of the land with GitHub Actions. [10:39] Does GitHub have a package repository? [14:19] For your build, you can keep them as just artifacts that are for that particular workflow, or you can create a package and put it into one of those package repositories for later retrieval. [14:25] Damian talks about the transition to deploying to the first pre-production environment in your chain. [19:12] What do the non-secret variables look like? [22:09] To what extent is there still overlap from Azure, and how does it deviate? [26:22] There are two options: there are actions that are in the marketplace, and then you can also run your own scripts. [30:10] Damian and his team are building around a pretty core experience where you have a project that you’re deploying to multiple environments. [34:24] How is Octopus Deploy similar? How is it different?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Damian Brady On DevOps for Data Science and Machine Learning Chris Patterson on Github Actions   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

15 August 2022


Greg Leonardo: Architecting for Azure  - Episode 205

Greg Leonardo: Architecting for Azure - Episode 205

Greg is a Cloud Architect that assists organizations with cloud adoption and innovation and is currently a Public Cloud Architect at AT&T. He has been working in the IT industry since his time in the military and is a developer, teacher, speaker, and early adopter. Greg has worked in many facets of IT throughout his career and is currently the president of TampaDev a community meetup that runs #TampaCC and various technology events throughout Tampa. Greg holds a certification as a Microsoft Certified Azure Solutions Architect Expert, Microsoft Certified Trainer, and is an Azure MVP.   Topics of Discussion: [2:45] Businesses still struggle with how to manage costs, even with all the new things that have surfaced in Azure. [3:30] Understanding your cost structures is critical. [6:20] What does the mindset look like? [6:43] What the heck is a Microsoft Certified Azure solutions architect expert? [9:09] The biggest thing that Greg can impress upon architects is that you're not always in control of your own destiny. [10:01] What is Greg’s favorite Diagramming Method or diagramming tool? [11:52] How does one go about making decisions and projecting what the monthly bill is going to be for a given application? [16:20] When building a service, Greg tries to start in the serverless arena, and then moves up from there. [25:13] What is the direction we are heading with Azure? [28:33] The go-to solutions that Greg has his teams use for just their individual network security for their own computer when they're not in a corporate building.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Greg Leonardo Takes an Azure Deep Dive   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

8 August 2022


Daniel Roth: Blazor Futures - Episode 204

Daniel Roth: Blazor Futures - Episode 204

Daniel Roth is a principal product manager on the ASP.NET team working on ASP.NET Core, Blazor, and other web features. He has previously worked on various parts of .NET, including System.Net, WCF, XAML, and ASP.NET. His passions include building frameworks for modern Web frameworks that are simple and easy to use.   Topics of Discussion: [2:45] Daniel talks about the high points of his career that led him to the ASP.NET team, along with a few changes he has seen in the industry, along the way. [6:25] The developer ecosystems have been opened up. [7:40] Daniel talks about Blazor Hybrid. [9:43]  If you have a web app, and you want to just reuse that UI within a native client app, you can have a common set of Blazor components that are used across both. [10:28] Daniel talks about .NET 7 and how they are taking it to the next level. [14:46] The Blazor Native Experiment is available through a project called the Mobile Blazor Bindings Project. [24:03] Jeffrey asks Daniel about his favorite ways that people should be testing the UI level of Blazor Applications. [27:03] What people should be expecting in the next year. [34:16] Tooling and debugging is an area we can continue to actively invest in.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! “Daniel Roth On Web Development With .Net 6” “Egil Hansen on Blazor Testing with bUnit”   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

1 August 2022


Kendall Roden: Azure Container Apps - Episode 203

Kendall Roden: Azure Container Apps - Episode 203

Kendall is a Senior Product Manager for Azure Container Apps based out of Austin, TX. When she’s not working, Kendall enjoys being outdoors, teaching spin classes, and hanging out with her cat, Koda.   Topics of Discussion: [3:46] Kendall talks about starting in consulting and building her skill set in customer empathy and understanding the pain points that developers are experiencing. [4:13] Even if it makes you uncomfortable, lean in as much as you can to opportunities for technical training. [7:16] What interested Kendall in working on things that are more in running applications vs. doing frameworks for building applications? [8:09] Even if you’re in operations at an organization, your overall objective is to help developers be more productive and focus on what’s making the company money and help them operate on what their core value proposition is for their customers. [11:35] Kendall discusses Azure Container Apps and starts with App Service. [21:02] Is Kendall working on Windows adapting containers? [24:02] Do you have more control in container apps than you do in App Service, or does that limitation still stay the same? [30:45] Kendall forecasts the future of container ops adoption and that we will see more and more cohesiveness in terms of the Azure portfolio. [31:40] What does the pricing model look like? [41:54] Kendall would recommend at least starting with the Azure Architecture Center.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Kendall Roden on Microsoft Cloud Kendall Roden Twitter The Azure Podcast Kendall Roden LinkedIn Kendall Roden GitHub Azure Container Apps Samples Azure-Samples Youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5rXtjltSImRsDw-sqr3wUDyG_IwlV_HN Azure Container Apps discord server   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

25 July 2022


Steve Sanderson: The future of Blazor and WebAssembly - Episode 202

Steve Sanderson: The future of Blazor and WebAssembly - Episode 202

Steve Sanderson is working as a developer for Microsoft in the team that brings you the ASP.NET technology stack, IIS, and other web things. Previously he developed .NET software as a contractor/consultant for clients in Bristol and beyond, plus wrote some books for Apress, such as Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework. From time to time, he speaks at user groups and conferences and recently has been running a bunch of training courses on topics such as C#, SQL Server, and of course ASP.NET MVC. Steve has been instrumental in some very visible projects. He started the Knockout.js project in 2010, an early javascript UI framework. He also designed the Azure Portal architecture that anyone using Azure uses daily.   Topics of Discussion: [4:07] Steve talks about the main steps that got him into Microsoft and his role in Blazor. [9:04] How does running SQLite in Blazor work? [13:35] Are there limitations on how long we can have it live between browser sessions? [15:36] Maui has been the biggest focus for the Blazor team throughout .NET. [22:36] What is the path of WebAssembly in the family of technologies? [23:11] What is WASI? [33:03] What does Steve see in the future and how might we be able to bridge more divides? [35:36] Steve mentions the different services to check out.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Steve Sanderson .NET Blog WebAssembly Steve was a guest on the Azure DevOps Podcast back in episode 106 in September of 2020.   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

18 July 2022


Greg Young: CQRS and EventSourcing- Episode 201

Greg Young: CQRS and EventSourcing- Episode 201

Greg Young is an independent consultant and serial entrepreneur. He has 10-plus years of varied experience in computer science from embedded operating systems to business systems and he brings a pragmatic and often unusual viewpoint to discussions. Greg coined the term “CQRS” (Command Query Responsibility Segregation) and it was instantly picked up by the community who have elaborated upon it ever since. He’s a frequent contributor to InfoQ, a speaker/trainer at Skills Matter, and also a well-known speaker at international conferences.   Topics of Discussion: [3:24] Greg talks about being poached from university and his path to computer science, starting in the lottery and horse racing systems. [7:25] Greg defines CQRS at the base level. [9:24] What is event sourcing? [11:25] How does it look in database technology? [19:19] How does asynchronous processing work with event sourcing? [22:44] Greg talks about causation ID and correlation ID. [26:49] If someone is running on Azure, what technology would be associated with the stream of event sourcing? [27:27] When you’re event sourcing, your events are your concept of truth. [28:15] What’s the relationship between event sourcing and CQRS? [31:16] How has Greg’s method of explaining these concepts changed over time? [31:36] When you teach something, you both get a better understanding of the thing that you’re teaching, and you get a better understanding of how to teach it to somebody.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Greg Young Twitter Greg Young GitHub Event Store Greg Young YouTube   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

11 July 2022


Tomas Petricek: Cultures of Programming - Episode 200

Tomas Petricek: Cultures of Programming - Episode 200

Tomas Petricek is a lecturer at the University of Kent and a partner at fsharpWorks. He believes that the most fundamental work is not the one solving hard problems, but the one that offers new ways of thinking. He follows this belief in his academic research on programming systems and the history and philosophy of computing, but also in his writing on functional programming and in his F# training and consulting.   Before joining Kent, Tomas did a Ph.D. on context-aware computations at the University of Cambridge, worked on F# tools in Microsoft Research, and built novel tools for data exploration at The Alan Turing Institute.   Topics of Discussion: [4:19] The Turing Institute, and a little bit more about Alan Turing. [6:01] How can we distill 70 years into something understandable in a reasonable period? [8:52] What were the early cultures of programming? [14:00] Fortran programming and how ALGOL was designed by a sort of more academic crowd as a universal programming language. [15:00] We hear some well wishes from listeners and past guests for the 200th episode! Thank you! [21:27] Tomas discusses hacker culture and how the term programmer has changed over the years. [26:06] Tomas’s prediction on where the culture of programming is going next. [27:03] The amazing ad for a programming system called Flow-Matic. [29:22] Why we need escape hatches is because there is a fundamental flaw with no-code and low-code approaches.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Cultures of Programming Sonic-Pi.NET Tomas Petricek Twitter fsharpworks Twitter Tomas Petricek Website   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

4 July 2022


Daniel Vacanti: Measuring Agile Software Teams - Episode 199

Daniel Vacanti: Measuring Agile Software Teams - Episode 199

Daniel is a 20-year software industry veteran who got his start as a Java Developer/Architect. He has spent most of the last 15 years focusing on Lean and Agile Practices. In 2007, he helped develop the Kanban Method for knowledge work. He even managed the world’s first project implementation of Kanban that year and, ever since, has been conducting Kanban training, coaching, and consulting. As the co-founder and CEO of ActionableAgile, Daniel provides industry-leading predictive analytics tools and services for any Lean-Agile process.   Topics of Discussion: [4:19] Daniel explains why he feels as though the right curriculum is not yet taught in college. [8:00] It’s important to bridge your conversations both in terms of the risk and your ability to deliver on a date in terms of risk. Then, you can have a conversation about what you want to do as a business to mitigate the risks and also accept that they are there in the first place. [10:14] Daniel explains his more data-informed approach when asked how long something is going to take. Jeffrey asks, but how do we find the data that helps us make informed decisions in the first place? [14:43] What are those numbers that give the right visibility? [16;03] The four aspects every manager of a software team should have at their disposal and be monitoring: Work in progress Throughput Cycle Time The age of items that they are working on right now [19:00] Our ability to come up with ideas is always going to outstrip our ability to execute them. That’s why backlogs grow over time. [21:49] Daniel explains the method to go from using Azure DevOps to having numbers at your disposal, and what are the two important pieces of data that you need? [24:41] How does the ActionableAgile tool help when every team board is totally different? [28:44] If your engineering practices are continuous, your process should be continuous as well.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Daniel's previous interview: “Daniel Vacanti On ActionableAgile” Daniel's latest book: When Will It Be Done? LinkedIn: danielvacanti Twitter: @danvacanti Email: Daniel@ActionableAgile.com ActionableAgile   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

27 June 2022


Andrew Lock: Web Applications in .NET6 - Episode 198

Andrew Lock: Web Applications in .NET6 - Episode 198

Andrew Lock is a senior software engineer at Datadog, working out of Devon, in the UK. He is a Microsoft MVP, Author of ASP.NET Core in Action, and has an active blog all about his experience working with .NET and ASP.NET Core.   Topics of Discussion: [3:35] Andrew discusses the high points in his programming career that steered him to work with .Net6. [5:30] Andrew walks us through all the .NET frameworks and demystifies the overwhelm around all the options. [9:38] Andrew’s favorite method at the moment for web applications on top of .NET is Razor Pages. [12:53] Does anyone really want web applications? [15:31] Andrew explains his philosophy and experience and guidance on testing. [19:18] Is there any kind of structure or pattern that people should be thinking about to keep the classroom lessons not overflowing? [26:16] What web applications would Andrew recommend? [30:19] The topic of custom applications and components comes up.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! ASP.NET — email jeffrey@clear-measure.com for a chance to win a free copy of ASP.NET Core in Action from Andrew Lock. — available book discount code: — Permanent discount code for Manning publications (35% off I believe), for all listeners, podazdev19 Carter Project Andrew Lock | LinkedIn | Github | Endpoints   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

20 June 2022


Nick Orlowsky: Deciding to Major in Computer Science - Episode 197

Nick Orlowsky: Deciding to Major in Computer Science - Episode 197

Nick is a rising Sophomore college student at The University of Texas in Austin, TX. He’s majoring in computer science and knew from a much earlier age that programming would be his career calling. He was a leader in his high school computer science classes and even competed in the Microsoft ImagineCup competitions, UIL competitions, Hackathons, and much much more. He works for various companies on programming projects during schooling and is currently spending this summer programming for Home Depot corporate.   Topics of Discussion: [4:35] Nick talks about how he got into computer programming and how he knew that programming would be his career calling. [5:53] Nick talks about stacking his high school curriculum with computer science classes. [8:50] What type of technology classes are offered at Nick’s college in computer science, and what type of classes are required vs. optional? [12:28] Did Nick have to ramp up on new tech stacks, or did he already know the ones he uses now? [15:02] Nick talks about the skills he thinks computer science majors need to be successful. [19:55] It’s easy to get distracted in general, but coding is so much more fun than just watching YouTube or scrolling on social media. [22:52] Nick learned typing from Typing.com. [25:57] What is Nick’s 10-year plan and what languages or tools is he dabbling in now? [27:12] The larger the project becomes, the more impossible it is to do it without a team. [27:49] Nick gives his advice to young and aspiring computer science majors and programmers. Find something you want to build, and take a couple of months to work on that.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Typing.Com   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

13 June 2022


Aaron Palermo: Zero Trust Networking - Episode 196

Aaron Palermo: Zero Trust Networking - Episode 196

Aaron is a DevOps engineer, solution architect, and all-around cybersecurity expert. He works for a global cybersecurity services company, is a member of the Cloud Security Alliance, and is a co-author of the up-and-coming Software Defined Perimeter Specification Version 2. Since last time (episode 18), Aaron was 1.5 years overseas supporting the Army and moved back to the U.S. last year to join Appgate as a Senior Solutions Architect.   Topics of Discussion: [4:11] What types of things has Aaron observed that programmers don’t typically gravitate towards, but they need to give some attention to in just the overall IT and security space? [9:42] Should developers be thinking about zero trust just for their production environments, or should they be thinking about it for their own working environments, as well? [13:30] Is there a standard set of tags that someone could use from day one? [15:15] A core tenet of Zero Trust is Enterprise Identity Governance. [17:35] Do the cloud providers already have this mechanism of automatically discovering via tags and/or is there something that needs to be added to what they provide? [22:36] What are the pros and cons of working with smaller vs. bigger companies? [24:41] What does Aaron see for the future?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Appgate — The leader in Zero Trust Network Access solutions Zero Trust Thirty EO 14028 — Executive Order on Improving the Nation’s Cybersecurity Presidential memo on Moving the U.S. Government Toward Zero Trust Cybersecurity Principles CISA’s focus on Zero Trust — 508 search results CISA’s Zero Trust Maturity Model document NIST — Implementing Zero Trust Architecture Cloud Security Alliance — Software Defined Perimeter and Zero Trust Platform One — “An official DoD DevSecOps Enterprise Services team for the DoD” leveraging CNAP for secure remote access to cloud resources. Department of Defense (DoD) Cloud Native Access Point (CNAP) Reference Design (RD)   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

6 June 2022


Philippe Kruchten: Controlling Your Architecture - Episode 195

Philippe Kruchten: Controlling Your Architecture - Episode 195

Philippe Kruchten has over 35 years of software development experience. Now retired, his experience focused mostly on large technical systems such as telecommunication, defense, aerospace, and software tools. He also spent 16 years as an educator and researcher in a major Canadian engineering school.   Topics of Discussion: [2:18] Philippe gives some of the highlights of his long career, starting first as a mechanical engineer and then traveling the world as a software engineer. [4:26] How Philippe has seen software architecture change over time and the struggles architects still face. [6:03] Software architects are among some of the most in-demand professions. [7:10] What makes software architecture different from other coding? [9:05] Discussing Building and Evaluating a Theory of Architectural Technical Debt in Software-intensive Systems and the three reasons for architectural debt. [11:31] A major reason for architectural debt in software is not understanding the architecture due to improper documentation. So what is the proper way to document? [17:23] Regardless of the format, each key audience needs a view specific to them, and how to document the decisions. [21:19] Is there a best approach for harvesting or understanding the actual architecture? [23:46] With a big architectural change, using systematic impact analysis and prototyping are ways to carefully approach the shift. [26:48] Some unsolved issues that remain within the industry and what a good software developer looks like, then vs. now.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! “Building and Evaluating a Theory of Architectural Technical Debt in Software-intensive Systems” “A General Model of Software Architecture Design Derived From Five Industrial Approaches” Software Systems Architecture 4+1 Architectural View Model IEEE 1471   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “I think we’ve made some progress. We understand the role of architecture a little bit better.”— Philippe [4:59] “We’re still hindered by the fact that architecture is hard to grasp; it’s hidden out there in the software, it's not visible at the surface.” — Philippe [5:05] “We’ve come a long way in making architecture a first-class citizen in a few organizations.” — Philippe [5:42] “Architecture, for me, is the set of design decisions you have to make usually early in the life of a system that will actually condition a lot of things in terms of structure and behavior of the system.” — Philippe [7:25] “It’s not programming; although the architecture will end up being code somewhere. The act of developing a software architecture is more about decision-making and understanding the intricate network of decisions and how they relate to each other.” — Philippe [7:58] “Not every software developer needs to be a software architect, but they need to understand what is the software architecture of the system I’m working on.” — Philippe [8:45] “You end up being in a position of architectural technical debt not because you made the wrong decision 10 years ago, but because those decisions are not the right one in the current circumstances. Then there is architectural debt because what you did 10 years ago was just plain stupid!” — Philippe [10:38] “Diagrams are useful for architects to communicate to another audience.” — Philippe [18:59]   Philippe: Website | Twitter | LinkedIn

30 May 2022


Adam Tornhill: Your Code as a Crime Scene - Episode 194

Adam Tornhill: Your Code as a Crime Scene - Episode 194

Adam Tornhill is a programmer who combines degrees in engineering and psychology. He's the founder of CodeScene where he designs tools for software analysis. He’s also the author of Software Design X-Rays, the best-selling book Your Code as a Crime Scene, Lisp for the Web, and Patterns in C. Adam’s other interests include modern history, music, and martial arts.   Topics of Discussion: [2:10] Adam talks about how he got his start in code metrics 25 years ago and why he’s discovered that it’s so hard to write good code. [3:48] What are the other book ideas Adam has to add to his existing four? [4:53] What motivated Adam to write Your Code as a Crime Scene and what is the premise? [9:02] When assembling the data, relevance, as well as quality, are both important. [10:29] Cyclomatic complexity is an old metric, as are many others, that is not quite tangible or relevant. [11:58] Why Adam prefers to look at code health vs. code quality. [13:26] The process is slightly different when looking at code health for existing code vs. writing new code. [15:23] How does CodeScene aid in the pull request process? [18:31] CodeScene integrates with your version control repository and work tracking tools to find where bugs were introduced. [22:22] Is CodeScene meant to be a standalone tool or can it work alongside many of the other tools on the market? [24:57] Adam’s rules of thumb for those getting started in software systems. [28:12] Why Adam’s preferred method of delivering software architecture has changed over the years. [30:36] What are the steps for implementing CodeScene into a codebase?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! CodeScene — Free Community Edition Adam Tornhill on Github Software Design X-Rays Your Code as a Crime Scene Lisp for the Web Patterns in C “Code Red: The Business Impact of Code Quality”   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “Software development and software code, in particular, are very abstract. There’s no way I can really take a software system and pull it out and turn it around and inspect it for flaws.” — Adam [6:34] “What I’m most interested in is trends; so are we moving in the right direction or the wrong direction?” — Adam [15:14] “My experience, from working with all of these companies, is that pull requests and code reviews, in general, are extremely valuable… but they also tend to become a bottleneck in practice.” — Adam [16:10] “A surprise is simply one of the most expensive things you can put into a software architecture.” — Adam [30:15] “While these mechanics are simple, information is only good when acted upon.” — Adam [31:20]   Adam: Website | Twitter | LinkedIn

23 May 2022


Rod Paddock: Application Longevity for Dummies - Episode 193

Rod Paddock: Application Longevity for Dummies - Episode 193

Rod Paddock is the CTO of Dash Point Software, Inc. and the Editor in Chief of CODE Magazine! In 2001, Rod founded Dash Point Software, Inc. to develop high-quality custom software solutions. With over 30 years of experience, some of his current and past clients include Six Flags, First Premier Bank, Microsoft, Calamos Investments, The U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Navy. Along with developing software, Rod is a well-known author and conference speaker. Since 1995, he has given talks, training sessions, and keynotes in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Rod was a guest way back in Episode 111.   Topics of Discussion: [4:19] What was the state of the industry like when Rod started teaching? [6:12] Rod talks about the event that led him to have dinner with Top Gun pilots, and a moment of celebrity fame in an elevator. [10:11] Rod talks about Code Magazine and how it has developed over the years. [11:01] Rod speaks about the state of remote work, and how it’s giving people time back for more creativity. [15:29] What are the important factors and Rod’s process when planning for applications to live a long time? [21:26] Rewriting applications is a lot of times harder than building from the ground up. [23:22] There are a lot of ways to build, and that includes both planning and a little bit of luck. [24:02] When do you know if it’s time to rebuild a current application? [26:08] You have to know where your problems and pain are, and every system has pain. [29:34] Why is laziness a good thing for a software developer? [36:50] People are very resilient and very resourceful, and they will figure out how to make your software do stuff you would never expect.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Dash Point Software, Inc. A Philosophy of Software Design, by John Ousterhout Software Engineering at Google: Lessons Learned from Programming Over Time, by Titus Winters, Tom Manshreck, and Hyrum Wright Code Magazine — Use Code TADP For Free Subscription The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, by Frederick P. Brooks, Jr.   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “I consider myself extremely fortunate in my whole career.” — Rod “Lots of people are getting essentially 20 hours a week back, and just not from commuting, which is pretty cool.” — Rod “Rewriting applications is a lot of times harder than building from the ground up.” — Rod “You have to pay attention to the way you’re building your applications, and that helps the longevity as well, and know the pieces that you can rip out and rebuild.” — Rod “People are very resilient and very resourceful, and they will figure out how to make your software do stuff you never thought it was going to do.” — Rod    Rod: Website | Twitter

16 May 2022


Udi Dahan: Distributed Computing - Episode 192

Udi Dahan: Distributed Computing - Episode 192

Udi Dahan is one of the world’s foremost experts on Service-Oriented Architecture and Domain-Driven Design and is also the creator of NServiceBus; the most popular service bus for .NET. Udi joined us back on Episode 32 to discuss Microservices.   Topics of Discussion: [2:47] Udi talks about some of the changes, and similarities, in distributed computing in the last five years as well as generational differences to approach learning. [11:27] Udi defines what a service mesh is and when it’s applicable. [14:46] Udi discusses his concerns regarding using a service mesh and common problems encountered. [22:28] With most of the new generation of programmers using Web service-based programming, what does Udi think they need to hear? [27:50] Why Udi thinks the larger companies and vendors need to take more responsibility and “do more good.” [32:48] Udi shares more on NServiceBus’s offerings and functionality and why developers need to learn more. [36:36] Are there any pieces of NServiceBus that will need more than just a .NET standard support?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Particular Software — NServiceBus Episode 32 — Microservices   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “Every generation of programmers needs to relearn kind of the same points over again.” — Udi [3:51] “We’re still essentially coming up with new generations of technologies that are addressing the same category of problems.” — Udi [6:16] “The problem is not rooted in what do they need to hear so much as who do they need to hear it from.”— Udi [23:51] “If you know a thing, if you can help, then you should.” — Udi [29:47] “NServiceBus essentially takes all of the problems that you never want to have, and the challenges that most people don’t know that they’re going to have so they don’t appreciate it until they have it, and essentially prevents them from happening.”— Udi [34:29] “That ounce of prevention is equivalent to a pound of cure.” — Udi [34:46]   Udi: Website | Twitter

9 May 2022


Scott Wlaschin: Domain Modeling Made Functional - Episode 191

Scott Wlaschin: Domain Modeling Made Functional - Episode 191

Scott Wlaschin is an expert on F#, author of the popular F# site fsharpforfunandprofit.com, and a board member of the F# Software Foundation. Known for his non-academic approach to functional programming, Scott is a popular speaker and has given talks at NDC, F# Exchange, DDD Europe, and other conferences around the world.   Topics of Discussion: [2:40] Scott talks about how he got into F#, and the nonlinear path his career has taken. [4:00] Scott walks us through the history of F#. [6:52] What types of applications should developers be looking at F# for? [10:55] What was Scott’s inspiration behind writing Domain Modeling Made Functional? [12:20] Domain-driven design has nothing to do with a particular language. It’s a process. [17:32] As an industry, whether it be literature or art, there’s so much to be gained by observing and reading prior works of others. [19:55] How does functional thinking impact architecture? [20:51] In functional programming, you want everything to be deterministic. [28:34] What are some of the examples of transcription scripts? [31:10] In functional programming, the main thing is the function and not the object.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! F# Software Foundation Domain Modeling Made Functional: Tackle Software Complexity with Domain-Driven Design and F#   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: [3:00] “I started learning functional programming because I sort of felt like I really knew everything there was to know about databases and all that stuff. I thought I wanted something different.” — Scott [8:52] “It really depends on how you like to program. If you like to program in a functional style, and you want to be on .NET, then F# is perfect.” — Scott [12:00] “Don’t focus on the technology, focus on what you are actually trying to build.” — Scott [17:32] “As an industry, whether it be literature or art, there’s so much to be gained by observing and reading prior works of others.” — Jeffrey   Scott:  Website | Twitter

2 May 2022


Heather Downing: Retooling for the Future - Episode 190

Heather Downing: Retooling for the Future - Episode 190

Heather is a passionate coder and entrepreneur. She has experience working with Fortune 500 companies building enterprise-level voice, mobile, and C#/.Net applications. She focuses on external thought leadership, encouraging fellow programmers to present on topics outside of the office and in the community. She is also an international technical speaker, recently speaking at NDC, an early adopter of technology, and a conference organizer at KCDC, the Kansas City Developers Conference.   Topics of Discussion: [3:00] Heather talks about her deep dive into her local community to figure out how we learn and how different generations are discovering content. [3:12] We now have a multigenerational community and it’s important to consider that there are now four different groups of people that learn completely differently. [5:40] With so many people from different cultures and backgrounds, Heather thinks that if we’re not accommodating, we’re not going to be able to replace ourselves. [8:23] Heather explains the importance of every developer finding their favorite documentation. [12:29] The great equalizer is that we all want to solve problems. Heather talks about the importance of letting beginners ask the right questions, and giving them the space to problem solve. [14:36] Heather describes the reality she sees from university programs and boot camps, along with the importance of having basic people skills. [18:27] Heather describes how time boxing and The Pomodoro Technique can provide a structure for productivity and can help you accomplish more without overwhelm. [21:36] The book Atomic Habits was a powerful read for Heather and she wishes she had read it before! One of the takeaways is that anything that is broken down seems more digestible. When you focus on just getting one percent better at something every day, your goals start to get more manageable. [24:24] Resiliency is key in software. [24:49] Sometimes what you’re trying to get better at is not software coding at all, but communication and really listening. [24:50] Heather gives her take on if you need to have a University degree to go into software, and where she thinks the engineering field will end up. [34:42] Heather’s advice for young developers looking at older work — keep in mind that it’s possible that they did the best they could have at the time. Plus, one day that will be you, so try to have some grace and understanding.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Charisma University Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones Kevlin Henney, Medium Kevlin Henney, NDC London   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “You have to be able to think about how you want to solve this problem, but also communicate it and if you can’t do that, it will limit you. You can be amazing, but if nobody knows what you’re talking about, because you never mention it or you never speak up, that’s going to limit you.” “With so many people from different cultures and backgrounds, I think if we are not accommodating, we’re not going to be able to replace ourselves.” — Heather [5:15] “I feel like every developer needs to just sit down and find their favorite documentation that they’ve learned from and see if they can at least mimic that.” — Heather [8:23] “If you’re not enjoying something, maybe you can suggest a different way instead of just quitting.” — Heather [12:04] “You aren’t guaranteed to succeed. But you are guaranteed to struggle, struggle well.” — Heather [23:24] “Maybe it really just takes a slight adjustment or retooling instead of blowing it away and building something completely from scratch again.” — Heather [34:00]   Heather: Website | Twitter

25 April 2022


Mark Seemann: Code That Fits In Your Head - Episode 189

Mark Seemann: Code That Fits In Your Head - Episode 189

Mark Seemann is a Danish software developer based in Copenhagen, Denmark. His professional interests include functional programming, object-oriented development, as well as software development in general. Apart from writing two books, he has also written numerous articles and blog posts about related topics. Despite being a mostly .NET developer, Mark takes most of his inspiration from sources across a wide range of technologies, including Haskell and lots of pattern books. Originally poised to become a rock star or (failing that) graphic novelist (in the European tradition) he one day found himself with insufficient talent for either, a master's degree in Economics, and a desire for working with computers. He has been doing the latter intermittently since 1995.   Mark is the author of two books so far: Author of Dependency Injection .NET as well as Code That Fits In Your Head.   Topics of Discussion: [4:55] Mark talks about the thought process behind writing Code That Fits In Your Head. [10:10] Why doesn’t Mark like software projects? [13:06] Yes, we want to create value for the businesses when we write code, but we also have to have a longer view on things as well. [17:11] Mark shares three of the most things for getting started with a new application. [19:46] Mark walks us through the process of automating a build. [22:42] Most compiler warnings indicate that you have problems with your code. [28:29] What are some of Mark’s resources and pieces of advice for younger programmers? [35:31] In Denmark and Scandinavian cultures, you often feel like the CEO is within close reach and someone that you could easily have lunch with. Mark talks about overcoming resistance in long-time developers when learning something new that may cause some anxiety or insecurity.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Code That Fits In Your Head   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “We’re the odd types that find it fun to type characters that sometimes test the reaches of the keyboard, and just tell the computer what to do.” — Jeffrey [4:20] “Treat all warnings as errors.” — Mark [18:40] “Nowadays, it’s not so much from the management that the resistance exists, but actually from other people.” — Mark [37:40]   Mark: Pluralsight.com/authors/mark-seemann

18 April 2022


Derek Comartin: A Software Architect’s Mindset - Episode 188

Derek Comartin: A Software Architect’s Mindset - Episode 188

Derek Comartin is a software developer with two decades of professional software development experience. He has written software for a variety of business domains, such as distribution, transportation, manufacturing, and accounting. Derek also has a very active blog and YouTube channel (CodeOpinion.com) that focuses on Software Architecture and Design.   Topics of Discussion: [3:21] Derek’s mentor was an accountant who gave him more insight into business processes and changed his way of thinking. [9:42] How can we better relate processes in the real world to the solutions we are writing? Derek gives an example of reservation patterns and how that can translate to different places in software. [13:23] A conversation that is often lacking is that if you’re writing software for business, are you really understanding what the business is trying to do? [20:10] You can be an individual contributor, even if your communication is just with your team. [28:22] A good question to ask is why you have this problem in the first place. [29:53] When software does something, who actually does it? [37:31] The best developers Derek has talked with or worked with have a unique combination of technical skill and business acumen.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events!   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “If we’re talking about an individual team, I think everybody can have or share some of the responsibilities. I think everybody can play a part in understanding what you’re trying to accomplish.” — Derek [23:25] “One thing that I’ve seen hurt programmers’ trust is getting frustrated if somebody doesn’t think like them.” — Jeffrey [24:53] “The best developers I’ve talked with or worked with have this unique combination of technical skill, and this business acumen or knowledge.” — Derek [32:08]   Derek: CodeOpinion

11 April 2022


Daniel Markham: How to Share What You Know - Episode 187

Daniel Markham: How to Share What You Know - Episode 187

Daniel is a semioticist logician (otherwise known as a programmer). He likes to help people learn to make better tech. He believes that once you know the “why,” you can figure out the “what” on your own. As an active coder and manager, Daniel has spent time the last several years with clients as an Agile/XP Technical Coach, helping them rediscover how to discover and create value at speed. His clients include several Fortune 100 companies all over North America. He is also a technical coach and the author of Info-Ops and Info-Ops ll cross-dedicated and shared (due to high cost/low availability) hardware systems. Package management and high-layer orchestration through other tools, layers is where Azure is partially intersecting.   Topics of Discussion: [4:41] Dan talks about his website and building a place to learn and relax. [5:55] Dan discusses when he learned that he wanted to teach others and share what he had learned. [9:43] Dan walks us through his setup and how he focuses on the content more than the technical aspects. [11:38] What is Dan’s chosen format for getting it up on a video? [16:22] How does Dan prioritize what he is teaching? [18:13] What should new programmers know? [20:23] It’s important to step outside the constraints you are given. [21:38] What’s “good enough programming?” [23:49] Strong typing systems are only useful in the terms of one particular business feature at one time. [26:24] The platform and the language choices should actually tell the business something they didn’t know before. [33:57] By creating these larger universal-type systems, we’re subsuming the business into the code.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events!   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “I used to tell people you know, at heart, I really am a writer. I’m a writer who can program very well and has a sort of natural skill in programming.” — Daniel “I think it’s important to demonstrate kicking back and just talking about what’s going on in the tech world without any sort of altering your agenda.” — Daniel “I find that we have a lot of people trying to be perfect programmers who have no experience of being good enough programmers, and that’s a problem the industry’s had for a long time.” — Daniel    Daniel: Website | Dark | Podcast | Books

4 April 2022


Kevin Kirkus on Automated Testing Embedded Code - Episode 186

Kevin Kirkus on Automated Testing Embedded Code - Episode 186

Kevin Kirkus is a Principal Engineer at Intel. He has been there since 1999, designing, building, and testing Intel processors, both the chip and the code that runs the chips. Kevin is a Post-Silicon Validation Architect Lead for multiple Intel Xeon generations and more recently transitioned to Global Post-Silicon Automation Lead for server, client, and device products at Intel Corporation. He has served in various past areas of validation, such as PCIe, socket-interconnect, Platform Configurations, Boot Flows, Fuse, before transitioning to more technical leadership roles in validation architecture and strategy. As a Technical Leader in silicon validation automation, his roles and responsibilities have extended to global standardization and alignment of tools, flows, and methodologies across Intel global product segments (server, client, device), including mentoring environment domain, leads, aligning global sites and strengthening local product sites to excel in automation investments. His technical and leadership experience for validating advanced complex technology has been integral to the success of Intel product teams and their competitive products. He is passionate about developing people and future leaders, building on their strengths, influence, and impact.   Topics of Discussion: [3:33] What are some high points that lead Kevin to where he is today? [8:06] Kevin talks about focusing on functional validation execution, and what he likes as a Post-Silicon Validation Architect Lead. [9:03] Kevin walks us through the process from where the code is embedded, the silicon is made, and there’s a system of trial and error to test if you are on the right track. [15:33] What are the penalties for the turnaround time? [15:48] What is the mix of code types that are a part of this? [17:18] Kevin talks about the concept of fuses and SKUs or stock-keeping units. [21:12] Kevin talks about the format of the test themselves, the language in which he writes the test cases, and the partnership between the host and target system. [31:42] Where are test harness codes and firmware loaders stored? [31:47] Firmware has to be handled a little bit differently; it has to be cross-platform deployment packaging. [35:20] Most of Intel Xeon’s solutions are proprietary, and their bug tracking is proprietary. [39:05] How does Kevin coach people to have the technical skills they need in this space?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events!   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Quotes: “My job starts when they have gotten to the point where it boots up and it’s reaching the point of fetching the operating system code to where we can actually see it in the operating system.” — Kevin [20:02] “If we can deliver a healthy environment to our functional validation team, it gives them a chance to focus their energies on writing tests that actually find the most bugs.” — Kevin [39:54]   Kevin Kirkus: LinkedIn   Intel Intel Xeon

28 March 2022


Sam Nasr on Azure AI & ML - Episode 185

Sam Nasr on Azure AI & ML - Episode 185

This week, Sam Nasr returns to the show. Sam is an IT Consultant specializing in .Net, SQL Server, and Azure. He is a Sr. Software Engineer focused on the Microsoft stack of technologies including .Net, SQL Server, Azure. As part of NIS Technologies, he provides consulting services, training, and custom app development to bring more value to business applications. Sam is also a leader at the Cleveland C#/VB .Net user group.   Topics of Discussion: [2:37] Sam talks about getting inspiration from a video featuring Saquib Shaikh, a blind software engineer at Microsoft that developed services that helped him get by day-to-day, which was made public. It was a moving video and it got him into cognitive services, and he started diving more into AI and ML from that point. [4:10] How are AI and machine learning similar? How are they different? [4:15] Do you have to use the Azure services? [6:27] What are some of Sam’s favorite AI or ML products? [8:03] With Azure Cognitive Services, it’s a variety of different services. There are some for language, some for speech, some for vision, and decision-making. [10:19] How do we go from a microphone to a text string? Does that happen on the end device, or do we send the file to Azure? [15:10] What is the testing method for this type of application? [18:09] How does this relate to bot framework? [24:28] What applications does it tend to work best on? [26:50] What does it look like to deploy a new release candidate from environment to environment and then to production? What is the promotion process of an application like this? [30:39] You need to have a good representation of your data. It’s got to be clean and then trained on an appropriate number of records.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events!   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.   Sam Naser: GitHub projects YouTube Presentations samnasr@live.com   Overview of Cognitive Services:  “Adding Machine Learning to .Net Applications” youtube.com/watch?v=dMHlbZvISUI Build 2016 AI Video

21 March 2022


Chris Tacke on .NET 6 IoT on Linux - Episode 184

Chris Tacke on .NET 6 IoT on Linux - Episode 184

Chris Tacke is an industry leader in managed application development for industrial process control, medical, telematics, and just about any other embedded industry. Chris specializes in Windows CE and the .NET Compact Framework, and mobile and embedded device application development.   Topics of Discussion: [2:22] Fun fact! Chris got a degree in Geology long ago, and his first job was doing seismic work and hand-analyzing a lot of data. Chris talks about his first foray into programming, a job in Excel, writing VBA macros to analyze the data. [4:08] Chris walks us through a job at Microsoft by way of a horse race in Virginia during the .com boom. After the .com crash, he worked at a company that made single board computers and moved to be an engineering manager for the Windows CE department. He was independent for 20+ years before joining Hypergiant, and then Wilderness Labs came onto his radar. [6:42] Chris is the owner of the Meadow Core pieces and does a fair bit of the driver development. [8:49] How does the Jetson Nano compare to Raspberry Pi? [13:47] Chris talks about the first goal to run on modern.net. [16:41] What is the vision now to say that we need to do this on Linux? [21:33] Is this the same vision as Maui, to run anywhere embedded? [23:38] How does it impact the process of building, test suites, and different test environments? [24:18] Chris talks about Meadow Test Suite, which has the goal to deploy binaries down to a device and find tests that look just like an xUnit test that can then talk to hardware. [30:56] This totally redefines the term of the “full-stack” developer. [31:12] What can people utilize today, and what is the DevOps chain Chris and his team are using?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Wilderness Labs Dev Camp ClassMeadowsOS Wilderness Labs — Github Jetson Xavier NX Series   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

14 March 2022


Henry Quillin on Prepping for a Career as a Software Engineer - Episode 183

Henry Quillin on Prepping for a Career as a Software Engineer - Episode 183

Henry Quillin is a high school senior interested in software development, entrepreneurship, and blockchain/crypto. He has completed several internships and other contracts and recently earned the rank of Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America. He always has several software projects going including ProjectNEWM, an attempt to decentralize the music industry, and when not buried in VSCode or books, he enjoys weightlifting, cooking, and listening to podcasts. You can check out his website at henry quillin.me.   Topics of Discussion: [2:39] Henry talks about becoming interested in software development and programming as early as 4th grade. While his friends were playing video games, he was creating them. [5:00] Henry discusses his first shadowing experience that ended up turning into a paid internship at Jackson & Ryan Architects. [10:10] What was it like for Henry to see the development process from a bird’s eye view during his first paid internship in tech at a startup called Original Nations? [10:47] How did Henry get into Clear Measure? [12:18] Henry talks about the huge community in programming that wants to help and how they have connected him with different opportunities. [12:55] What is projectNEWM? How is it like a decentralized Spotify? [16:51] Henry has some sound advice for fellow young adults his age looking to get into the programming industry, and what he feels the benefits of internships are. [27:06] What is the value that Henry sees in college, and which schools are his top choices? [29:05] Henry feels that if you want to become a developer, just really try and get some experience.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! ProjectNEWM Henry Quillin   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

7 March 2022


Chris Patterson on Messaging systems with MassTransit - Episode 182

Chris Patterson on Messaging systems with MassTransit - Episode 182

Chris Patterson is a Principal Architect at McKesson, the oldest and largest healthcare company in the nation. He is responsible for architecture supporting applications and services that enable McKesson’s distribution and technology solutions around the globe. Chris is active in the open-source community and has created many projects including MassTransit, a distributed application framework for .NET. He also is a regular conference speaker, sharing his knowledge and experience with developers across the world. Chris is a 13-year Microsoft MVP Award winner for his contributions to the software development community.   Topics of Discussion: [1:53] Chris talks about his career background and highlights, and the path that led him to be a lifetime software developer. The first application Chris wrote was a game on Apple TV, and when he first started his major professional career, he was building a lot of distributed systems. [5:44] Alt .Net became the community to say that there may be a better way to do this, with C# and .Net. [7:35] Chris gives us a full rundown of his stack. [8:50] What type of environment does Chris work in? [10:28] What exactly is MassTransit? [14:20] Chris and Jeffrey discuss Azure Service Bus and RabbitMQ. The most widely used transport with MassTransit is RabbitMQ, and for good reason because it’s a solid message broker. [18:40] Is MassTransit just for the asynchronous or is there any way for the two programs to talk to each other? [23:04] What flexibility does MassTransit give? [25:51] Has Chris seen a way to consolidate the serialization in the DTO types, so that you don’t have to have specific types all over the place just because you happen to be going over a different channel? [31:00] Is it fair to ask whether or not you want your server endpoints to be directly called by your customers, or provide them with an API that lets some of their code run in their process? [37:25] When something’s wrong with the processor, how do you get back on track? How can we even prevent it? [42:32] MassTransit is free, and Chris explains there will never be a charge to use it.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! MassTransit Chris Patterson: LinkedIn | Twitter  http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/altnetconf/ — in case this was the Alt Net Yahoo Conf group!   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

28 February 2022


Mohamed Kabiruddin on Migrating to Azure SQL - Episode 181

Mohamed Kabiruddin on Migrating to Azure SQL - Episode 181

Mohamed Kabiruddin is a Senior Program Manager in the Azure SQL Product Team and is currently located in Redmond, Washington. Prior to joining the Product Team, he was a Cloud Solution Architect working with enterprise customers in Australia on all things Azure Data & AI. He is very passionate about the data community and loves to be a part of events that provide an opportunity to interact with like-minded data folks.   Topics of Discussion: [2:12] What are the high points that have led Mohamed up to what he is doing now for Microsoft in his career? [4:42] Mohamed talks about the migration process and how some of the components fit together. [8:24] What type of schema should they key off of? [10:10] The key is understanding what your data type is, how these map to the cloud services, and how these actually scale on the cloud. [10:59] Mohamed talks about the renaming of Azure’s synapse, and what it means in terms of rebranding. [14:00] What should the average .NET developer really pay attention to of all these investments that are happening? [18:37] What is the most popular option that their customers leverage for SQL databases? [20:37] How long does the auto-resume take? [24:46] Mohamed discusses the SQL Server Management Studio and the tremendous growth of Azure Data Studio. Where really Azure Data Studio shines is with this new persona of developers, database professionals, or data professionals starting to mix and match the way they query and manage databases.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! podcast@palermo.network Azure SQL Azure Database Migration Guides Azure Data Studio   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

21 February 2022


Shawn Wildermuth on Next-gen web services  - Episode 180

Shawn Wildermuth on Next-gen web services - Episode 180

Shawn Wildermuth has been tinkering with computers and software since he got a VIC-20 back in the early ’80s. He has been a Microsoft MVP, Pluralsight Author, and filmmaker. You can reach him at his blog at wildermuth.com or find out about his film at helloworldfilm.com.   Topics of Discussion: [2:51] What were some of the highlights of Shawn’s career? How does his pragmatism come into play when helping developers create projects that actually add value? [5:04] What does Shawn mean when he says he offers real value consulting. [7:43] Shawn gives us the rundown on what’s new in next-generation web services. [13:57] What is the magic of SignalR? [21:04] What does gRPC look like? What are the libraries? [21:30] What are protocol buffers? [23:23] Does Shawn have any favorite gRPC samples? [24:36] Where would Shawn want to see web service APIs like in the future? [28:50] With web service APIs, the normal thing is for every different request, there's a different URL that you call. But for asynchronous queuing, it’s normal to have one queue address and any number of these message types. Yeah. Why the difference? [33:28] Does SignalR have a guaranteed delivery configuration?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! podcast@palermo.network  Shawn Wildermuth on YouTube     Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

14 February 2022


Shaun Walker on Blazor and Oqtane - Episode 179

Shaun Walker on Blazor and Oqtane - Episode 179

Jeffrey welcomes Shaun Walker, creator of Oqtane and also DotNetNuke web application frameworks, which have earned the recognition of being amongst the most pioneering and widely-adopted open-source projects native to the Microsoft platform. He has over 30 years of professional experience in architecting and implementing enterprise software solutions for private and public organizations. Shaun is also currently employed as the CTO of Professional Services for Cognizant. He talks with Jeffrey about Blazor, Oqtane, and what’s next in his professional world.    Topics of Discussion: [2:49] Shaun’s claim to fame is creating DOTNETNUKE, a very popular web application framework in 2003. It was one of the first large open-source projects of the Microsoft stack and had a very large community. [5:25] What is Oqtane? [7:37] Jeffrey and Shaun talk about the Built on Blazor website. [9:12] One of the biggest debates is which flavor of Blazor would you be? So, which one would Shaun be? [10:45] It’s kind of unlikely that you would use the Blazor server if you are considering Angular. [14:01] What were the big changes that Shaun has seen in .NET? How has technology evolved? [22:09] Jeffrey and Shaun discuss error boundaries. [27:02] Should we default to always caring about the URL structure? Or should that just be a use case for only that subset of applications that need it? [30:56] Why hasn’t Shaun been a big fan of Google Analytics? [33:36] Does the Oqtane framework build smartphone apps? [36:52] For the people who know how to use C#, is it better to grab an application framework like Oqtane or better to pull in some low code offerings in certain places?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! podcast@palermo.network  Shaun Walker DNN Oqtane.org .NETFoundationProjectCommittee Oqtane Github repo Oqtane philosophy Error Boundary and Logging in Blazor  Activity trend analysis of .NET Foundation member projects      Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

7 February 2022


Jeffrey Palermo on Software Careers - Episode 178

Jeffrey Palermo on Software Careers - Episode 178

This episode gives the listener a rundown of the categories of work that are required in every software project. Jeffrey discusses a few of the many different types of careers in the software industry, defining what security means to you and your product, and executing your vision.   Topics of Discussion: [3:38] Jeffrey names a few of the many roles that may be at a software company: the founder, programmers, product visionary, architect, developers, builders, sellers, project managers, and program managers. [5:00] Specialized job titles are everywhere, and there is no standard job title for people who work in software. [5:18] If it’s a new piece of software, someone needs to effectively write the press release text and market the product. What are the other roles that make up the elements of design? [8:20] Your press release is your vision, and now you can back it up with your design and execution. [9:52] How a person experiences the software is a huge element of the design. [14:49] We have to define what our vision of secure is. [18:00] As your team grows, be conscious about the appropriate time to fill distinct roles. Chances are at the smaller companies, your team members will be doing more than one thing. [19:25] Oftentimes, the testing aspect is split between the people who are working on the envisioning, the selling, and the improving.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! podcast@palermo.network    Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

31 January 2022


Bryan Costanich on .NET 6 IoT - Episode 177

Bryan Costanich on .NET 6 IoT - Episode 177

This week, Jeffrey welcomes Bryan Costanich, Founder of Wilderness Labs and former VP of Xamarin. Bryan talks with us about the state of .NET, the advantages and disadvantages of moving into the embedded space, and how embedded computing is the new revolution. Bryan is also on a mission to leave the world a little better than he found it.   Topics of Discussion: [2:04] Bryan talks about his background and time at Xamarin, Microsoft, and the origins of Wilderness Labs. [4:16] What is the state of .NET? In the embedded system world, what are the realistic options and future in 2022 and beyond? [8:04] What are both the advantages and disadvantages of moving into the embedded space? [11:04] Bryan discusses how a lot of the advantages of microcontrollers moving to embedded are historical in the sense that you are developing for embedded devices that haven’t changed a lot since the ’70s and ’80s. [12:30] Seventy percent of all security bugs aren’t even an issue in .NET. [15:05] Bryan talks about his intent to make it easier for people to use and to create the ideal experience through Xamarin. [15:41] The next phase of humankind’s technological computing journey is embedded computing. This is the new revolution. [16:45] There are three parts of the IoT market: consumer, commercial, and industrial. [20:23] Bryan talks about how Xamarin’s main products are compromised and where they land on the spectrum. He discusses Azure Sphere and Raspberry Pi. [26:29] What exactly does Bryan develop with? He describes his setup. [31:09] Some fun smart chicken coop talk! [34:42] How does crash reporting work in Xamarin? [36:55] In the core compute module, how does one build the enclosure that it snaps into? [39:11] What is the most common product mix? [39:30] When will Xamarin’s products be released?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Wilderness Labs Raspberry Pi Azure Sphere Bryan Costanich   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

24 January 2022


Jeff Fritz on The state of .NET - Episode 176

Jeff Fritz on The state of .NET - Episode 176

This week, Jeffrey welcomes Jeff Fritz to the show. As an experienced developer, technical educator, and PM on the .NET team at Microsoft, Jeff also founded the Live Coders team on Twitch where he regularly livestreams builds of websites and fun applications. The two Jeffs talk about .NET 6, the .NET Conf, Jeff’s passion for getting .NET in education and what that takes, and why C# needs to also be in more standard settings. They also talk about starting simple and building to the complex in education, .NET notebooks, and resources for people to learn, just for the sake of learning.   Topics of Discussion: [3:29] Where should one start with the .Net Conf? What were some of Jeff’s biggest moments from the conference? [4:29] Jeff talks about what he likes about the .NET Maui application. [9:29] Why isn’t C# being taught more widely in schools? Jeff says that we need to get C# into colleges and high schools, and make more educational material available for the kids, now that .NET is open source. [11:19] Is .NET ready for education? What are we missing? [13:52] Jeff talks about his class every Monday, C# with CSharpFritz. [20:08] Why does Jeff recommend that programmers learn to learn? [22:28] What is the benefit of being specialized in one area, and what makes up the divide? Is it the applications that people work in? The tools they use? [26:56] Why should we collaborate? [30:53] When we educate people, we should give them the basic feature first, then start making it more complex. [35:11] Does Jeff think that .NET 6.0 is the catalyst that’s needed to get C# into places like code.org?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! bit.ly/dotnetdevopsebook — Click here to download the .NET DevOps for Azure ebook! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Jeff Fritz: Website | C# with CSharpFritz | Twitter | Twitch  .NET for Students Visual Studio GitHub .NET 6.0 .Net Conf .Net Maui Visual Studio Code C#.Net Kubernetes   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

17 January 2022


Buck Woody on Data Science - Episode 175

Buck Woody on Data Science - Episode 175

This week, Jeffrey is joined by Buck Woody, Applied Data Scientist working on the Azure Data Services team at Microsoft. Buck has over 39 years of professional and practical experience in computer technology and is also a globally sought-after speaker and author.   In this jam-packed episode, Buck talks about his passion for data and why it’s important to recognize that data is the central part of anything, which means keeping people employed. He talks about his role in machine learning and AI in Microsoft, and why we have to be extra careful when letting machines make the final call, why data science is useful, and the difference between business intelligence and data science. Buck shares the number one thing he feels developers need to know, and a few free resources that you can use to expand your knowledge and skills.   Topics of Discussion: [2:00] Jeffrey welcomes Buck and gives a quick overview of his background and how he got into data and security. Buck has worked with many top companies including IBM, NASA, and started at Microsoft about 16 years ago.  [5:00] Jeffrey joined the Red Dog team, which was the early part of Azure. [6:12] What was working in tech and AI back in the 1970s, compared to today? [9:48] How do we take some of the AI technology for granted? [10:04] What is data mining? [15:00] What does Buck feel is the number one thing a developer needs to understand about data and effective queries? [20:44] What is Buck’s definition of Big Data? [22:46] What is the difference between business intelligence and the idea around data science? [24:25] What is the number one question Buck asks when someone tells him they want artificial intelligence? [25:47] Why don’t you need business intelligence to do data science? [26:03] What is the age-old practice of ETL? [27:12] What is source data poisoning, and how does it affect our algorithms? [30:31] It is important for AI to augment human reasoning. Buck and Jeffrey talk about the example of recognizing red vs. green lights. [34:20] Jeffrey and Buck explore the construct of Excel Flash Fill. [37:02] What are the go-to tools that developers should be installing? What are some free Microsoft resources, and what are Cognitive Services?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! bit.ly/dotnetdevopsebook — Click here to download the .NET DevOps for Azure ebook! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Buck Woody: Twitter | LinkedIn Using Excel Flash Fill Microsoft AI School Azure Cognitive Services Microsoft Tech Community Data Architecture Star Trek Anna Hoffman   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

10 January 2022


Jimmy Engström on Blazor - Episode 174

Jimmy Engström on Blazor - Episode 174

This week, Jeffrey is joined by Jimmy Engström, a Senior Developer, author, and speaker.   Since he was 7 years old and got his first computer, Jimmy has been on the cutting edge of technology, always developing, and trying new things. When he got wind of Blazor, he immediately realized the potential and adopted it when it was only in beta. Since then, he has been running Blazor in production since it was launched by Microsoft.   Jimmy’s passion for the .NET industry and community has taken him all around the world and has even earned him the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional award for the last 8 years in a row. Additionally, Jimmy is the author of Web Development with Blazor and the co-host of Coding After Work; a podcast and stream.   In this episode, Jimmy shares what he thinks every developer should know when it comes to Blazor, his favorite Blazor components, insights regarding integrating Blazor into a DevOps environment, his career journey in Blazor, and about his book, Web Development with Blazor, A hands-on guide for .NET developers to build interactive UIs with C#.   Topics of Discussion: [:36] About The Azure DevOps Podcast, Clear Measure; the new video podcast Architect Tips; and Jeffrey’s offer to speak at virtual user groups. [1:15] About today’s episode with Jimmy Engström. [2:20] Jeffrey welcomes Jimmy to the show and congratulates him on his book on Blazor. [2:50] Jimmy shares his career background and his professional body of work. [6:55] When did Jimmy become interested and invested in Blazor? What led him to writing a book about it? [11:29] What should every developer know about Blazor? [18:44] A word from Azure DevOps Podcast’s sponsor: Clear Measure. [19:16] Jimmy talks Blazor architecture and APIs. [21:59] Blazor components that Jimmy and his team especially love using. [25:15] Jimmy’s opinions on Radzen and Telerik. [26:25] Jimmy shares when he first adopted Blazor and the big changes he has noticed as he’s moved from .NET 5 to .NET 6. [29:36] Jimmy’s insights regarding integrating Blazor into a DevOps environment. [32:50] Where to find Jimmy online. [35:09] Jeffrey thanks Aaron Stannard for joining the podcast.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! bit.ly/dotnetdevopsebook — Click here to download the .NET DevOps for Azure ebook! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Jimmy Engström’s Microsoft Profile Jimmy Engström’s Twitter @EngstromJimmy EngstromJimmy.com Jimmy Engström’s LinkedIn Web Development with Blazor, A hands-on guide for .NET developers to build interactive UIs with C#, by Jimmy Engström (on PacktHub) Web Development with Blazor: A hands-on guide for .NET developers to build interactive UIs with C#, by Jimmy Engström (on Amazon) Jimmy Engström on Sessionize CodingAfterWork.com Blazor SignalR Blazm.net Infragistics Telerik Radzen   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

3 January 2022


Aaron Stannard on the Actor Model with Akka.NET | Part 2 - Episode 173

Aaron Stannard on the Actor Model with Akka.NET | Part 2 - Episode 173

In this episode, Jeffrey is rejoined by Aaron Stannard for the second half of their two part interview! Be sure to turn into last week’s episode, “Aaron Stannard on the Actor Model with Akka.NET | Part 1” to learn all about Aaron’s career history and the creation of Akka.NET.   Aaron is the founder and CEO of Petabridge and Sdkbin, building open source tools for .NET developers to build concurrent and distributed applications. He’s also the founder of MarkedUp Analytics, a real-time in-app marketing and analytics service used by 1000+ developers, and has spent some time inside Microsoft as a Startup Developer Evangelist.   In this episode, Aaron discusses the general use cases of Akka.NET, the problem it addresses, where and how to use the actor model, and more. Don’t miss out on this deeply fascinating two-part series with Aaron Stannard!   Topics of Discussion: [:36] About The Azure DevOps Podcast, Clear Measure; the new video podcast Architect Tips; and Jeffrey’s offer to speak at virtual user groups. [1:13] About today’s episode with Aaron Stannard. [1:53] For application types, if someone is building a web application, a native application, or a mobile app, would they put Akka.NET in a backend process that consumes messages being received from somewhere? [3:53] Is high-scale more so Akka.NET’s bread-and-butter as opposed to low-scale, but constantly running? [10:10] Is the transport always a queue like Azure Service Bus or is it ever a web service call? [13:32] Is Akka.NET used instead of or with other frameworks? [15:32] Aaron shares several use cases of Akka.NET and explains the problems that it can address. [22:02] A word from Azure DevOps Podcast’s sponsor: Clear Measure. [22:37] Why a developer might look at/use Akka.NET. Aaron also explains another area where actors are used. [26:56] The nuanced things you can do with Akka.NET that you can’t do with other built-in tools in platforms like Azure. [27:28] How close on the network do the servers need to be to participate? [27:53] Aaron explains how Akka.Cluster would work for a specific use case problem. [29:43] Where the actor model can help developers. [33:17] The overhead requirements for Akka.NET. [35:04] Where to learn more about Akka.NET and find Aaron Stannard online. [37:19] Jeffrey thanks Aaron Stannard for joining the podcast.   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer’s Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! bit.ly/dotnetdevopsebook — Click here to download the .NET DevOps for Azure ebook! Jeffrey Palermo’s YouTube Jeffrey Palermo’s Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! .NET Conf Akka.NET Akka.NET Bootcamp | Petabridge Petabridge Blog Aaron Stannard’s Website Aaron Stannard’s Twitter @Aaronontheweb RabbitMQ Azure Service Bus Akka.Cluster MAUI.NET “When and How to Use the Actor Model An Introduction to Akka NET Actors” (Microsoft Visual Studio Youtube Channel)   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

27 December 2021

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